Fall 2021 Auction Featured Photos

Highly Important David Drake June 28, 1854 Stoneware Jug Inscribed Highly Important David Drake June 28, 1854 Stoneware Jug Inscribed Highly Important David Drake June 28, 1854 Stoneware Jug Inscribed Highly Important David Drake June 28, 1854 Stoneware Jug Inscribed Highly Important David Drake June 28, 1854 Stoneware Jug Inscribed Highly Important David Drake June 28, 1854 Stoneware Jug Inscribed Highly Important David Drake June 28, 1854 Stoneware Jug Inscribed Highly Important David Drake June 28, 1854 Stoneware Jug Inscribed Highly Important David Drake June 28, 1854 Stoneware Jug Inscribed Highly Important David Drake June 28, 1854 Stoneware Jug Inscribed Highly Important David Drake June 28, 1854 Stoneware Jug Inscribed Highly Important David Drake June 28, 1854 Stoneware Jug Inscribed Highly Important David Drake June 28, 1854 Stoneware Jug Inscribed Highly Important David Drake June 28, 1854 Stoneware Jug Inscribed Highly Important David Drake June 28, 1854 Stoneware Jug Inscribed

An Iconic Work by David Drake. Highly Important Three-Gallon Alkaline-Glazed Stoneware Jug, Incised "Lm says this handle will crack," Signed and Dated "Dave / June 28. 1854," David Drake at Lewis Miles' Stony Bluff Manufactory, Edgefield District, SC, 1854.

This famous jug, memorably appraised on a 2000 episode of the PBS series, Antiques Roadshow, features one of Drake's most intriguing inscriptions, one which offers insight into the relationship between the potter and his enslaver, Lewis Miles. As viewers of this work, we are given a rare glimpse into the interaction between Drake and Miles on the day the object was made.

Dr. Arthur Goldberg and James Witkowski describe this fascinating work thusly in their seminal Ceramics in America 2006 article, "Beneath his Magic Touch: The Dated Vessels of the African-American Slave Potter Dave": "Lewis Miles’s personal involvement in the stoneware production, as well as Dave’s dry wit and his ability to tease his owner, is revealed in the inscription on the jug signed by Dave on June 28, 1854: 'Lm says this handle will crack.'"

Few of Dave's inscriptions reveal the potter's personality and add to the mystique of this artisan as these words do. In his large, deeply-scrawled script, Drake boldly defies the opinion of his master in words that are literally set in stone for all to see. As such, this inscription is regarded as one of Dave's most powerful, subversive, and enigmatic incised quotations--one which also, almost paradoxically, imbues the work with a strong sense of humor. Adding further significance and humor to the story is the fact that the handle, to this day, has not broken or even cracked, proving Miles wrong and vindicating the craftsmanship of Drake. H 13 1/4".

Literature: Discussed in Goldberg and Witkowski, "Beneath his Magic Touch: The Dated Vessels of the African-American Slave Potter Dave," Ceramics in America 2006, p. 64; Discussed in Todd, Leonard. Carolina Clay: The Life and Legend of the Slave Potter Dave. New York: W.W. Norton & Co., 2008, p. 121; Discussed in Finkel, Jori. "The Enslaved Artist Whose Pottery Was An Act of Resistance," The New York Times, June 17, 2021; Discussed in Chaney, Michael A. Picturing Slavery: Hybridity, Illustration, and Spectacle in Antebellum Slave Narrative. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2005, p. 230; Discussed in Chaney, Michael A. Fugitive Vision: Slave Image and Black Identity in Antebellum Narrative. Bloomington, Indiana University Press, 2008. p. 177; Discussed in Chaney, Michael A. "The Concatenate Poetics of Slavery and the Articulate Material of Dave the Potter." African American Review 44, No. 4 (Winter 2011); Discussed in Chaney, Michael A. (ed.) Where Is All My Relation? The Poetics of Dave the Potter. New York: Oxford University Press, 2018, p. 120; Discussed in Chaney, Michael A. "Words, Wares, Names: Dave the Potter as American Archive," Anglia 138, No. 3 (2020); Discussed in Hager, Christopher. Word by Word: Emancipation and the Act of Writing, Cambridge, Harvard University Press, 2013, p. 71; Discussed in Clare, Claudia. Subversive Ceramics, London, Bloomsbury Press, 2016, p. 56.

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Exceedingly Important Stoneware Jug w/ Elaborate Incised Ship Decoration, probably Crolius Family, New York City, 18th centuryExceedingly Important Stoneware Jug w/ Elaborate Incised Ship Decoration, probably Crolius Family, New York City, 18th centuryExceedingly Important Stoneware Jug w/ Elaborate Incised Ship Decoration, probably Crolius Family, New York City, 18th centuryExceedingly Important Stoneware Jug w/ Elaborate Incised Ship Decoration, probably Crolius Family, New York City, 18th centuryExceedingly Important Stoneware Jug w/ Elaborate Incised Ship Decoration, probably Crolius Family, New York City, 18th centuryExceedingly Important Stoneware Jug w/ Elaborate Incised Ship Decoration, probably Crolius Family, New York City, 18th centuryExceedingly Important Stoneware Jug w/ Elaborate Incised Ship Decoration, probably Crolius Family, New York City, 18th centuryExceedingly Important Stoneware Jug w/ Elaborate Incised Ship Decoration, probably Crolius Family, New York City, 18th centuryExceedingly Important Stoneware Jug w/ Elaborate Incised Ship Decoration, probably Crolius Family, New York City, 18th centuryExceedingly Important Stoneware Jug w/ Elaborate Incised Ship Decoration, probably Crolius Family, New York City, 18th centuryExceedingly Important Stoneware Jug w/ Elaborate Incised Ship Decoration, probably Crolius Family, New York City, 18th centuryExceedingly Important Stoneware Jug w/ Elaborate Incised Ship Decoration, probably Crolius Family, New York City, 18th centuryExceedingly Important Stoneware Jug w/ Elaborate Incised Ship Decoration, probably Crolius Family, New York City, 18th century

American Ceramic Masterwork. Exceedingly Rare and Important Stoneware Jug with Profuse Incised Decoration of a Sailing Ship with American Flag, Manhattan, NY origin, probably Crolius Family, 1791-1792. This recently-surfaced masterwork from the Manhattan potting tradition features possibly the finest rendering of a sailing ship seen in American stoneware. Festooned with twenty sails and replete with incised and impressed circular details throughout, this design also depicts one of the earliest images of an American flag on an American-made ceramic object. The fourteen stars on the large flag at the ship's stern date this jug circa 1791-1792, after the admission of Vermont into the Union. Its craftsmanship and subject matter serve as a document in clay for the burgeoning reliance on quality, domestically-produced goods in a young America, then only fifteen or sixteen years old. Coupling high artistic appeal with exceptionally early American history, this work is regarded among the most important examples of 18th century pottery produced in this country. Provenance: A fresh-to-the-market example, which recently surfaced in the Southern United States. H 14".

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Extremely Rare and Important Anna Pottery Stoneware Snake JugExtremely Rare and Important Anna Pottery Stoneware Snake JugExtremely Rare and Important Anna Pottery Stoneware Snake JugExtremely Rare and Important Anna Pottery Stoneware Snake JugExtremely Rare and Important Anna Pottery Stoneware Snake JugExtremely Rare and Important Anna Pottery Stoneware Snake JugExtremely Rare and Important Anna Pottery Stoneware Snake JugExtremely Rare and Important Anna Pottery Stoneware Snake JugExtremely Rare and Important Anna Pottery Stoneware Snake JugExtremely Rare and Important Anna Pottery Stoneware Snake JugExtremely Rare and Important Anna Pottery Stoneware Snake JugExtremely Rare and Important Anna Pottery Stoneware Snake Jug

Anna Artistry. Outstanding Salt-Glazed Stoneware Temperance Jug with Applied Figural Decoration and Incised Image of Anna Pottery, Wallace and Cornwall Kirkpatrick, Anna, IL, circa 1880. This work displays the Kirkpatricks' mastery of modeling and motion, conveyed through the sinuous snake devouring a man headfirst on the vessel's front. A sense of vitality and urgency is further communicated through the smaller snakes below, edging closer to the tortured man. In classic Kirkpatrick style, other figures decorate the vessel, including two rear ends of men "going in" to the jug, a rear end of a rat entering the jug, a dung beetle, and a molded image of a nude siren with lyre, evocative of the seduction of alcohol. Among the most important aspects of this work is its fine incised rendering of Anna Pottery on the side of the jug, featuring numerous windows, a covered porch, two kiln chimneys at one end, and a house chimney at the opposite end. Inscribed across the front of the building are the words, "STONEWARE" and "ANNA POTTERY." One of the finest examples of Kirkpatrick Brothers stoneware that we have ever offered, a work that seamlessly melds the utilitarian stoneware tradition with the rising American Art Pottery Movement of the late 19th century. Literature: Illustrated and discussed in Mohr, Richard. Pottery, Politics, Art: George Ohr and the Brothers Kirkpatrick. Urbana and Chicago: University of Illinois Press, 2003. H 10 1/2".

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Exceptional 4 Gal. J. & E. NORTON / BENNINGTON, VT Stoneware Jug w/ Outstanding Standing Deer DecorationExceptional 4 Gal. J. & E. NORTON / BENNINGTON, VT Stoneware Jug w/ Outstanding Standing Deer DecorationExceptional 4 Gal. J. & E. NORTON / BENNINGTON, VT Stoneware Jug w/ Outstanding Standing Deer Decoration

Striking Stag. Exceptional Four-Gallon Stoneware Jug with Cobalt Standing Deer Scene, Stamped "J. & E. NORTON / BENNINGTON, VT," circa 1855. The finest Norton standing deer jug that we have seen, this work features an unusually large size to both the vessel and design. The deer alone stands an impressive 10 1/2" tall, exhibits crisp slip-trailing, and includes classic stump, fence, and groundcover embellishments surrounding the animal. H 17".

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Extremely Rare and Important Shenandoah Valley Stoneware Poem Jar by D. L. Eberly.Extremely Rare and Important Shenandoah Valley Stoneware Poem Jar by D. L. Eberly.Extremely Rare and Important Shenandoah Valley Stoneware Poem Jar by D. L. Eberly.Extremely Rare and Important Shenandoah Valley Stoneware Poem Jar by D. L. Eberly.Extremely Rare and Important Shenandoah Valley Stoneware Poem Jar by D. L. Eberly.

Southern Poem Jar. Exceedingly Rare and Important Two-Gallon Stoneware Jar with Freehand Cobalt Poem, Signed "D.L.E." and Stamped " FROM / J. EBERLY & BRO. / STRASBURG, VA.," Daniel Letcher Eberly at the J. Eberly & Bro. Pottery, Strasburg, VA, circa 1877-1885. The poem reads,

2. Y's. U. B
2. Y's U. See
2. Y's U Think
U.R. For Me.
D.L.E.

Regarded as the Eberly pottery's masterpiece in stoneware, this wonderful jar displays D.L. Eberly's proficiency as an artist in clay and the written word. Using letters to represent words in a rebus-like manner, the poem, taken from related rhymes of the period, is romantic and playful. The repeated use of the number "2" to denote the word "too" may be a pun on the fact that the jar measures two gallons. The word, "Strasburg," written vertically down the body of the jar and flanked by regionally-styled brushwork, proudly states where the piece was made. Examples of stoneware featuring poetry written in rhyming verse are extremely rare. Eberly's charm and flair for writing are evidenced by a surviving diary and numerous love letters to his future wife, Estelle Golladay. Provenance: Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates Auctions, The Collection of the Late John and Lil Palmer, April 5, 2014, lot 29; Ex-Collection Bill and Leah Pollard, Aldie, VA; Green Valley Auctions, March 5-6- 1993; Ex-Collection Tom and Liz Thorpe, Catlett, VA. H 11 3/4".

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Rare and Fine Manhattan Stoneware Jug w/ Large Incised Bird Decoration, probably Crolius Family, late 18th / early 19th centuryRare and Fine Manhattan Stoneware Jug w/ Large Incised Bird Decoration, probably Crolius Family, late 18th / early 19th centuryRare and Fine Manhattan Stoneware Jug w/ Large Incised Bird Decoration, probably Crolius Family, late 18th / early 19th centuryRare and Fine Manhattan Stoneware Jug w/ Large Incised Bird Decoration, probably Crolius Family, late 18th / early 19th centuryRare and Fine Manhattan Stoneware Jug w/ Large Incised Bird Decoration, probably Crolius Family, late 18th / early 19th century

Rare and Fine Three-Gallon Stoneware Jug with Large Incised Bird Decoration, Manhattan, NY origin, probably Crolius Family, late 18th or early 19th century. H 15 3/4".

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Outstanding Stoneware Pitcher w/ Man s Bust Inscribed Outstanding Stoneware Pitcher w/ Man s Bust Inscribed Outstanding Stoneware Pitcher w/ Man s Bust Inscribed Outstanding Stoneware Pitcher w/ Man s Bust Inscribed Outstanding Stoneware Pitcher w/ Man s Bust Inscribed

Decoration and Form. Outstanding Stoneware Pitcher with Freehand Cobalt Decoration of a Hatted Man Raising a Glass, Inscribed "all time happy!," attributed to William Macquoid, Manhattan, NY, circa 1870. Featuring large, crisp decoration and whimsical inscription, this work is one of only a few figural-decorated pitchers known from this pottery. H 11".

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Exceptional Five-Gallon Stoneware Cake Crock w/ Standing Dog Decoration, West Troy Pottery

Exceptional Five-Gallon Stoneware Cake Crock with Cobalt Standing Dog Decoration, Stamped "WEST TROY, NY / POTTERY," New York State origin, circa 1875. Relatively few figural-decorated cake crocks are known in American stoneware, this example potted in an extraordinary size. H 10" ; Diam. (across top) 14".

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Very Rare Paul Cushman (Albany, NY) Stoneware Jug w/ Incised Bird Decoration, c1810Very Rare Paul Cushman (Albany, NY) Stoneware Jug w/ Incised Bird Decoration, c1810Very Rare Paul Cushman (Albany, NY) Stoneware Jug w/ Incised Bird Decoration, c1810Very Rare Paul Cushman (Albany, NY) Stoneware Jug w/ Incised Bird Decoration, c1810Very Rare Paul Cushman (Albany, NY) Stoneware Jug w/ Incised Bird Decoration, c1810

Very Rare Three-Gallon Stoneware Jug with Incised Bird Decoration, Stamped "PAUL : CUSHMANS," Albany, NY, circa 1810. H 16".

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Exceptional Richard Remmey, Philadelphia, PA, Stoneware Presentation PitcherExceptional Richard Remmey, Philadelphia, PA, Stoneware Presentation PitcherExceptional Richard Remmey, Philadelphia, PA, Stoneware Presentation PitcherExceptional Richard Remmey, Philadelphia, PA, Stoneware Presentation PitcherExceptional Richard Remmey, Philadelphia, PA, Stoneware Presentation PitcherExceptional Richard Remmey, Philadelphia, PA, Stoneware Presentation PitcherExceptional Richard Remmey, Philadelphia, PA, Stoneware Presentation Pitcher

Exceptional Half-Gallon Stoneware Presentation Pitcher with Elaborate Cobalt Floral Decoration, Incised "John N. Carley / 1894," attributed to Richard C. Remmey, Philadelphia, PA, 1894. H 9".

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Important Important Important Important Important Important Important

Southern Presentation Jar. Exceedingly Rare One-Gallon Stoneware Jar with Elaborate Cobalt Floral Decoration, Inscribed "Smith / Airville," Baltimore, MD origin, circa 1825-1830. One of a small number of surviving jars made for merchant and delegate to the Virginia Legislature, Thomas Smith, for use on his Airville Plantation, located in Gloucester County, Virginia. H 10 1/4".

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The Finest Known Thomas Commeraw, Corlears Hook, NY Stoneware JugThe Finest Known Thomas Commeraw, Corlears Hook, NY Stoneware JugThe Finest Known Thomas Commeraw, Corlears Hook, NY Stoneware JugThe Finest Known Thomas Commeraw, Corlears Hook, NY Stoneware JugThe Finest Known Thomas Commeraw, Corlears Hook, NY Stoneware JugThe Finest Known Thomas Commeraw, Corlears Hook, NY Stoneware JugThe Finest Known Thomas Commeraw, Corlears Hook, NY Stoneware JugThe Finest Known Thomas Commeraw, Corlears Hook, NY Stoneware JugThe Finest Known Thomas Commeraw, Corlears Hook, NY Stoneware JugThe Finest Known Thomas Commeraw, Corlears Hook, NY Stoneware JugThe Finest Known Thomas Commeraw, Corlears Hook, NY Stoneware JugThe Finest Known Thomas Commeraw, Corlears Hook, NY Stoneware JugThe Finest Known Thomas Commeraw, Corlears Hook, NY Stoneware Jug

African-American Ceramic Masterwork. Exceptional Three-Gallon Stoneware Jug with Elaborate Impressed Drape-and-Tassel Motif, Stamped "COMMERAWS STONEWARE N. YORK CORLEARS HOOK," Thomas Commeraw, Manhattan, NY, late 18th / early 19th century. Featuring exemplary color, highly unusual placement of the maker's mark, and extravagant use of Commeraw's classic impressed designs, this jug is regarded as the greatest surviving example of the potter's work. Thomas Commeraw was the first African-American pottery owner and one of the nation's earliest documented artisans of African descent to operate his own business and sign his ware. An abolitionist and civil rights activist in federal-era New York City, in 1820 Commeraw traveled to the west coast of Africa to help plant a repository for Africans rescued off of slave ships. This jug's outstanding color and wonderful stamping suggest it may have served to distinguish the potter as a leading producer of stoneware in Manhattan, possibly displayed as a storefront piece. The artistry of this work rank it among the most important examples of African-American utilitarian art known. H 15".

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Extremely Rare Extremely Rare Extremely Rare Extremely Rare Extremely Rare Extremely Rare Extremely Rare Extremely Rare Extremely Rare Extremely Rare Extremely Rare Extremely Rare

Western Pennsylvania Folk Sculpture. Exceedingly Rare and Important Glazed Redware Inkstand with Dog Finial, Signed "Made by / John Grady / 1866," Shanksville, Somerset County, PA, 1866. This delicate work exhibits a high level of craftsmanship in its pierced-work body, relief jagged carving, ropetwist handles, paw feet, and coleslaw-furred dog. It retains its original removeable well and sander, a rarity for this form. Few examples of Western Pennsylvania redware of this quality are known, pieces by members of the Grady and Swank families representing the most artistic produced in the entire region. A related inkstand by John's father, Henry, was sold in Crocker Farm's Kelly Young Sale, January 30, 2010, lot 130. Provenance: Collection of Lewis Fenley "Dusty" Parker. L 5 3/8" ; W 3 3/4" ; H 4 3/4".

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Extremely Rare Extremely Rare Extremely Rare Extremely Rare Extremely Rare Extremely Rare Extremely Rare

Exceptional Form. Exceedingly Rare Glazed Redware Razorback Hog Flask, Incised "the oil of gladness / suck me and be happy," Signed "W.H. Rager," William Henry Rager, Palatine, WV or possibly Greensboro, PA origin, circa 1875-1885. Made by Rager at his Palatine stoneware manufactory, or possibly earlier during his tenure in Greensboro, this outstanding work is the only redware pig flask from the Western PA / West VA potting tradition that we are aware of. Its humorous inscription includes the term, "oil of gladness," used to describe God's anointing in both the Old and New Testaments of the Bible. Provenance: Collection of Lewis Fenley "Dusty" Parker. L 7 1/4".

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Extremely Rare Signed Jacob Neifer, Montgomery County, PA Redware Cabin BankExtremely Rare Signed Jacob Neifer, Montgomery County, PA Redware Cabin BankExtremely Rare Signed Jacob Neifer, Montgomery County, PA Redware Cabin BankExtremely Rare Signed Jacob Neifer, Montgomery County, PA Redware Cabin BankExtremely Rare Signed Jacob Neifer, Montgomery County, PA Redware Cabin BankExtremely Rare Signed Jacob Neifer, Montgomery County, PA Redware Cabin BankExtremely Rare Signed Jacob Neifer, Montgomery County, PA Redware Cabin BankExtremely Rare Signed Jacob Neifer, Montgomery County, PA Redware Cabin BankExtremely Rare Signed Jacob Neifer, Montgomery County, PA Redware Cabin BankExtremely Rare Signed Jacob Neifer, Montgomery County, PA Redware Cabin BankExtremely Rare Signed Jacob Neifer, Montgomery County, PA Redware Cabin BankExtremely Rare Signed Jacob Neifer, Montgomery County, PA Redware Cabin BankExtremely Rare Signed Jacob Neifer, Montgomery County, PA Redware Cabin Bank

Rosetta Stone. Extremely Rare Redware Log Cabin Bank with Two-Color Slip Decoration, Signed "Jacob Neifer," Montgomery County, PA, circa 1860. This work is the only signed example that we have seen from a group of elaborate, hand-modeled redware banks produced at the same pottery in Pennsylvania during the second half of the 19th century. Several, including this cabin, sold in 1991 at the well-known Christie's auction of the Seamen's Bank for Savings' vast collection of mechanical and still banks. Known for their prodigious size and remarkable detail, banks by this potter, now documented as Jacob Neiffer (working at the Frederick, Montgomery County, PA pottery of his father, Christian Neiffer), rank among the most extraordinary pottery examples produced in 19th century America. Related masterworks include an iconic, large-sized bank in the form of Santa Claus, sold in Crocker Farm's May 21, 2005 auction, which set a record for a Pennsylvania redware bank. The cabin offered in our Fall auction features an exceptional glaze and appealing figural embellishments in the form of a cat scaling the corner of the dwelling, birds perched on the roof, and a woman seated on a bench with gathering basket. Provenance: Collection of Lewis Fenley "Dusty" Parker; Christie's Sale 8368, Sept. 6 1997, lot 162 (includes lot sticker on underside); Ex-Collection Seamen's Bank for Savings. L 6 1/4" ; W 5 1/2" ; H 4 1/2".

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Outstanding Eastern Pennsylvania Redware Sugar Jar w/ Yellow-Slip Floral Decoration, late 18th or early 19th centuryOutstanding Eastern Pennsylvania Redware Sugar Jar w/ Yellow-Slip Floral Decoration, late 18th or early 19th centuryOutstanding Eastern Pennsylvania Redware Sugar Jar w/ Yellow-Slip Floral Decoration, late 18th or early 19th centuryOutstanding Eastern Pennsylvania Redware Sugar Jar w/ Yellow-Slip Floral Decoration, late 18th or early 19th centuryOutstanding Eastern Pennsylvania Redware Sugar Jar w/ Yellow-Slip Floral Decoration, late 18th or early 19th centuryOutstanding Eastern Pennsylvania Redware Sugar Jar w/ Yellow-Slip Floral Decoration, late 18th or early 19th centuryOutstanding Eastern Pennsylvania Redware Sugar Jar w/ Yellow-Slip Floral Decoration, late 18th or early 19th centuryOutstanding Eastern Pennsylvania Redware Sugar Jar w/ Yellow-Slip Floral Decoration, late 18th or early 19th century

Form and Decoration. Outstanding Open-Handled Redware Jar with Yellow-Slip Floral Decoration, Eastern PA origin, late 18th or early 19th century. Provenance: Collection of Lewis Fenley "Dusty" Parker. H 7" ; Diam. (at rim) 6 1/2".

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Exceptional Pennsylvania Redware Plate w/ Three-Color Slip Decoration

Color and Condition. Exceptional Glazed Redware Plate with Crosshatched Three-Color Slip Decoration, Berks County, PA origin, 19th century. Among the most striking plates from the region that we have offered. Provenance: Collection of Lewis Fenley "Dusty" Parker. Diam. 9 1/4".

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Exceptional Exceptional Exceptional Exceptional Exceptional Exceptional Exceptional Exceptional

Western PA Incised Eagle. Large-Sized Stoneware Keg-Form Cooler with Incised Federal Eagle Decoration, Incised "1841," Stamped "EZER WHITE," Ezer (Ezra) White, Mercer, Mercer County, PA, 1841. Few examples of incised stoneware from Western Pennsylvania are known, this example featuring one of the earliest renderings of a Federal eagle seen in stoneware from the region. Decades later, cobalt-stenciled eagles would become synonymous with the Western PA stoneware aesthetic. This cooler is decorated with poured brown slip under a clear salt glaze. The few surviving works by White indicate he was proficient in both stoneware and redware production. A heavily-decorated redware tea canister by White, dated 1846, was sold in Crocker Farm's March 23, 2019 auction, lot 174. A related tea canister resides in the collection of the Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Folk Art Museum, Williamsburg, VA. While other examples of White's work include a hand-incised signature, this cooler is the first piece that we have seen marked with a maker's stamp. H 20".

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Extremely Rare Solomon Loy / Refined Stoneware / 1855 Alamance County Stoneware JarExtremely Rare Solomon Loy / Refined Stoneware / 1855 Alamance County Stoneware JarExtremely Rare Solomon Loy / Refined Stoneware / 1855 Alamance County Stoneware JarExtremely Rare Solomon Loy / Refined Stoneware / 1855 Alamance County Stoneware JarExtremely Rare Solomon Loy / Refined Stoneware / 1855 Alamance County Stoneware JarExtremely Rare Solomon Loy / Refined Stoneware / 1855 Alamance County Stoneware JarExtremely Rare Solomon Loy / Refined Stoneware / 1855 Alamance County Stoneware JarExtremely Rare Solomon Loy / Refined Stoneware / 1855 Alamance County Stoneware JarExtremely Rare Solomon Loy / Refined Stoneware / 1855 Alamance County Stoneware JarExtremely Rare Solomon Loy / Refined Stoneware / 1855 Alamance County Stoneware JarExtremely Rare Solomon Loy / Refined Stoneware / 1855 Alamance County Stoneware JarExtremely Rare Solomon Loy / Refined Stoneware / 1855 Alamance County Stoneware JarExtremely Rare Solomon Loy / Refined Stoneware / 1855 Alamance County Stoneware Jar

North Carolina Masterwork. Exceedingly Rare and Important Two-Gallon Cobalt-Decorated Stoneware Jar, Inscribed "Solomon / Loy / refien / d Stone Ware / 1855," Solomon Loy, Alamance County, NC, 1855. This newly-discovered work is emblematic of the diverse output of Solomon Loy, a potter who, decades earlier, produced some of the most elaborately-decorated redware in the entire country. Following a general trend throughout the nation in progressing from the production of redware to more-durable stoneware, this heavily-inscribed work includes a signature, date, and the important slogan, "refien/d(sic) Stone Ware." Other Southern potters, such as Thomas Chandler of Edgefield, SC and William R. Craven of Henderson County, TN, used terms like "Waranted Good" or "Warrented(sic) / to be stoneware" to emphasize the quality of their product. This jar survives as one of Loy's greatest salt-glazed stoneware creations, running counter to the majority of his work in this medium, which is typically found lacking cobalt and, when signed, bearing an impressed signature. Likely made less for use and more as a piece advertising the potter's abilities, this vessel features Loy's classic glaze runs and abundant use of slip-cup decoration, a treatment mastered from years of producing redware dishes. Provenance: A recently-discovered work, which descended in a Western NC family. H 12 3/4".

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Extremely Rare and Important Craven Family Stoneware Footed Sugar Bowl, North Carolina, 1853Extremely Rare and Important Craven Family Stoneware Footed Sugar Bowl, North Carolina, 1853Extremely Rare and Important Craven Family Stoneware Footed Sugar Bowl, North Carolina, 1853Extremely Rare and Important Craven Family Stoneware Footed Sugar Bowl, North Carolina, 1853Extremely Rare and Important Craven Family Stoneware Footed Sugar Bowl, North Carolina, 1853Extremely Rare and Important Craven Family Stoneware Footed Sugar Bowl, North Carolina, 1853Extremely Rare and Important Craven Family Stoneware Footed Sugar Bowl, North Carolina, 1853Extremely Rare and Important Craven Family Stoneware Footed Sugar Bowl, North Carolina, 1853Extremely Rare and Important Craven Family Stoneware Footed Sugar Bowl, North Carolina, 1853Extremely Rare and Important Craven Family Stoneware Footed Sugar Bowl, North Carolina, 1853Extremely Rare and Important Craven Family Stoneware Footed Sugar Bowl, North Carolina, 1853

Southern Rarity. Extremely Rare and Important Cobalt-Decorated Stoneware Sugar Bowl, Dated 1853, attributed to the Craven Family, Randolph or Moore County, NC, 1853. Relatively few examples of cobalt-decorated stoneware from North Carolina are known, the majority of which were produced by members of the Craven family of potters. This example is one of a few 19th century salt-glazed stoneware sugar bowls known from the entire state. Its distinctive vertical-handled, three-footed form is related to an incised sugar bowl made by Chester Webster in Randolph County, NC, circa 1850, illustrated in Quincy and Samuel Scarborough's North Carolina Decorated Stoneware: The Webster School of Folk Potters, p. 61. Relationships between Webster and Craven family vessel forms are noted in Scarborough, indicating the two families influenced each other's work. Corroborating these stylistic links, census research indicates, that for a period prior to 1870, Chester Webster lived two houses away from potter, B.Y. Craven (Scarborough, p. 95). Lot 14 in Crocker Farm's August 2020 auction, a jar with cobalt "1854" date and "T.W. CRAVEN" mark, exhibits a similar "open-topped" number 8 in the date, offering evidence that Thomas Wesley Craven (1829-1858) is the sugar bowl's possible maker. Provenance: Recently surfaced in Kentucky. H 4 1/2".

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Extremely Rare and Important BOONVILLE (Missouri) / 1832 Stoneware Jar w/ Elaborate Federal Eagle DesignExtremely Rare and Important BOONVILLE (Missouri) / 1832 Stoneware Jar w/ Elaborate Federal Eagle DesignExtremely Rare and Important BOONVILLE (Missouri) / 1832 Stoneware Jar w/ Elaborate Federal Eagle DesignExtremely Rare and Important BOONVILLE (Missouri) / 1832 Stoneware Jar w/ Elaborate Federal Eagle DesignExtremely Rare and Important BOONVILLE (Missouri) / 1832 Stoneware Jar w/ Elaborate Federal Eagle DesignExtremely Rare and Important BOONVILLE (Missouri) / 1832 Stoneware Jar w/ Elaborate Federal Eagle DesignExtremely Rare and Important BOONVILLE (Missouri) / 1832 Stoneware Jar w/ Elaborate Federal Eagle DesignExtremely Rare and Important BOONVILLE (Missouri) / 1832 Stoneware Jar w/ Elaborate Federal Eagle Design

Missouri Masterwork. Highly Important and Probably Unique Large-Sized Stoneware Jar with Cobalt Federal Eagle Decoration, Dated 1832, Stamped "BOONVILLE," MO origin, 1832. This stylishly-potted jar is the only example of stoneware that we have seen bearing the mark, "BOONVILLE." Its wonderful freehand decoration of a Federal eagle adds high artistic value to this historic "document in clay," believed to be the earliest signed and dated example of Missouri-made pottery known. H 18 1/2".

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Extremely Rare W-A-LEWIS / GALESVILLE-N-Y Figural-Decorated Stoneware JugExtremely Rare W-A-LEWIS / GALESVILLE-N-Y Figural-Decorated Stoneware JugExtremely Rare W-A-LEWIS / GALESVILLE-N-Y Figural-Decorated Stoneware JugExtremely Rare W-A-LEWIS / GALESVILLE-N-Y Figural-Decorated Stoneware Jug

Decoration and Maker. Extremely Rare Three-Gallon Stoneware Jug with Cobalt Figural Decoration, Stamped "W-A-LEWIS / GALESVILLE-N-Y," circa 1857-1860. This work features the first design of a person from this pottery that we have seen. A sense of action or immediacy is conveyed as the man attempts to maintain his balance against a gust of wind. Provenance: A recently-surfaced work, which descended in the family of the consignor. H 13 1/2".

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Extremely Rare Stoneware Vase with Cobalt Fish Decoration, Ohio originExtremely Rare Stoneware Vase with Cobalt Fish Decoration, Ohio originExtremely Rare Stoneware Vase with Cobalt Fish Decoration, Ohio origin

Extremely Rare Stoneware Vase with Cobalt Fish Decoration, OH origin, mid 19th century. Exceptional form with heavily-tooled neck and bold fish motif. H 9 1/2".

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Extremely Important Southern Stoneware African-American Preacher Face Vessel, Rock Mills, AlabamaExtremely Important Southern Stoneware African-American Preacher Face Vessel, Rock Mills, AlabamaExtremely Important Southern Stoneware African-American Preacher Face Vessel, Rock Mills, AlabamaExtremely Important Southern Stoneware African-American Preacher Face Vessel, Rock Mills, AlabamaExtremely Important Southern Stoneware African-American Preacher Face Vessel, Rock Mills, AlabamaExtremely Important Southern Stoneware African-American Preacher Face Vessel, Rock Mills, AlabamaExtremely Important Southern Stoneware African-American Preacher Face Vessel, Rock Mills, AlabamaExtremely Important Southern Stoneware African-American Preacher Face Vessel, Rock Mills, AlabamaExtremely Important Southern Stoneware African-American Preacher Face Vessel, Rock Mills, AlabamaExtremely Important Southern Stoneware African-American Preacher Face Vessel, Rock Mills, AlabamaExtremely Important Southern Stoneware African-American Preacher Face Vessel, Rock Mills, AlabamaExtremely Important Southern Stoneware African-American Preacher Face Vessel, Rock Mills, AlabamaExtremely Important Southern Stoneware African-American Preacher Face Vessel, Rock Mills, AlabamaExtremely Important Southern Stoneware African-American Preacher Face Vessel, Rock Mills, AlabamaExtremely Important Southern Stoneware African-American Preacher Face Vessel, Rock Mills, Alabama

Alabama Masterwork. Extremely Rare and Important Large-Sized Stoneware Figure of a Preacher, Rock Mills, AL, circa 1880-1890. Loosely-related to the iconic figural jugs of German-born Alabama potter, John Lehman, this folk sculpture ranks among the largest and most expressive figural ceramic works of 19th century America. Enigmatic in its function, this "preacher man" figure, displaying a wheel-thrown minister's hat, hands clasped in prayer, and incised cross on reverse, may have served some ceremonial purpose in a local church. Adding further intrigue is the oversized vent hole on the figure's reverse, large enough to place objects inside. Red cold paint, likely original to this work, highlights the hat and face. Alabama's face vessels, typically potted in a torso form, can be linked to the Edgefield face jug tradition, as many of the potters in this state were trained or influenced by artisans previously operating in Edgefield, South Carolina. As many of Edgefield's face jugs are believed to have been made by potters of African descent, the possibility exists that this figure was made by an African-American potter working in Alabama commemorating a local black preacher or church. Author, John Michael Vlach, in his seminal 1978 book, The African-American Tradition in Decorative Arts, discusses a figure likely by the same maker and its possible African-American origin. With similar form, size, facial structure, and virtually identical hat, Vlach describes this second example as "the masterwork among known ceramic torso figures." He writes, "The best of the Alabama trio is called Preacher Man. It is a bulky figure more than sixteen inches high. . . The overall handling of mass and form in this piece is so impressive that it stands out as the masterwork among known ceramic torso figures. One scholar has remarked that the statue projects a kind of sympathy for a black subject. If, indeed, the figure was meant to depict a black man or preacher, it is a competent and well-executed statement. Since the features of this piece tend to favor abstract presentation over naturalism, it might be classed as a black creation. It is not clear how one safely measures such an intangible as ethnicity in a mute work whose only history is rumor. More information here would be helpful, but it would not be surprising to discover Afro-American origins." (Vlach, pp. 92-93) The vessel Vlach is referring to was previously owned by prominent New York folk art collector, John Gordon, and sold in the 1999 Christie's, New York auction of his collection. It is pictured in Vlach's book, The African-American Tradition in Decorative Arts, as well as Robert Charles Bishop's well-known book, American Folk Sculpture. As stated, a number of clear stylistic similarities link this face vessel to the example offered in this auction. However, the face on the vessel to be auctioned is arguably more well-executed and expressive, clearly noted in the construction of the eyes. Gordon's example features sunken eyes assuming a somber tone. The eyes on the figure to be auctioned are bulging and lively with impressed pupils, creating a more pleasant or satisfied facial expression to the preacher. In addition, this figure's mouth, with its pinched, upward curling ends, creates a sort of smile, which is markedly different than the mouth of the Gordon example. If Vlach's suggestion regarding an African-American origin is correct, one possible maker is Edward "Ed" Rushton, listed in Brackner's Alabama Folk Pottery, p. 248. Born circa 1825-1830, Rushton was an ex-slave to the South-Carolina-trained Rushton family of potters. According to Brackner "in 1880, he lived near and probably worked for Ussery and Lane, but in 1900, he probably worked for Pittman Brothers" (Brackner, p. 248). Awe-inspiring in form, size, and sentiment, this work ranks among the greatest ceramic objects ever produced in the state of Alabama. Literature: For similar examples, see Christie's, Jan. 15, 1999, The John Gordon Sale of Folk Americana, lots 1167 and 1168; see also p. 220, fig. 412 of American Folk Sculpture by Robert Charles Bishop. For more information on Alabama face vessels and additional photos of similar examples, see also pp. 92-93 of The African-American Tradition in Decorative Arts by John Michael Vlach, University of Georgia Press, 1978. H 16 3/4".

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Exceptional Small-Sized Pennsylvania Redware Dish w/ Profuse Two-Color Slip Decoration, probably Berks CountyExceptional Small-Sized Pennsylvania Redware Dish w/ Profuse Two-Color Slip Decoration, probably Berks CountyExceptional Small-Sized Pennsylvania Redware Dish w/ Profuse Two-Color Slip Decoration, probably Berks CountyExceptional Small-Sized Pennsylvania Redware Dish w/ Profuse Two-Color Slip Decoration, probably Berks County

Decoration and Size. Exceptional Small-Sized Redware Dish with Profuse Two-Color Slip Decoration, PA origin, probably Berks County, 19th century. Among the most heavily-decorated redware dishes that we have offered. Provenance: Collection of Lewis Fenley "Dusty" Parker. Diam. 4 5/8" ; H 1 3/8".

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Exceptional Large-Sized Philadelphia Redware Charger w/ Elaborate Yellow Slip Decoration, early 19th centuryExceptional Large-Sized Philadelphia Redware Charger w/ Elaborate Yellow Slip Decoration, early 19th centuryExceptional Large-Sized Philadelphia Redware Charger w/ Elaborate Yellow Slip Decoration, early 19th century

Exceptional Large-Sized Redware Charger with Elaborate Yellow Slip Decoration, Philadelphia, PA origin, early 19th century. Provenance: Ex-Collection of Ross Trump and Ed Brown, Medina, OH; previously purchased by Ross Trump in the early 1960s from Ohio dealer, George Samaha. Diam. 16 1/2".

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Exceptional Southwestern PA Tanware Lidded Butter Crock Stenciled Exceptional Southwestern PA Tanware Lidded Butter Crock Stenciled Exceptional Southwestern PA Tanware Lidded Butter Crock Stenciled Exceptional Southwestern PA Tanware Lidded Butter Crock Stenciled Exceptional Southwestern PA Tanware Lidded Butter Crock Stenciled Exceptional Southwestern PA Tanware Lidded Butter Crock Stenciled Exceptional Southwestern PA Tanware Lidded Butter Crock Stenciled

Rare Lidded Tanware Presentation Butter Crock, Stenciled "SADDIE / OSTERMAIER," Greensboro or New Geneva, PA origin, circa 1885. A lesser-seen form in Western Pennsylvania tanware. The inclusion of a presentation name and the crock's lavishly-decorated lid make this a noteworthy example of the form. H (including lid) 7 1/2" ; Diam. 9 1/4".

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Scarce and Fine Large Tanware Pitcher, New Geneva or Greensboro, PennsylvaniaScarce and Fine Large Tanware Pitcher, New Geneva or Greensboro, PennsylvaniaScarce and Fine Large Tanware Pitcher, New Geneva or Greensboro, PennsylvaniaScarce and Fine Large Tanware Pitcher, New Geneva or Greensboro, PennsylvaniaScarce and Fine Large Tanware Pitcher, New Geneva or Greensboro, PennsylvaniaScarce and Fine Large Tanware Pitcher, New Geneva or Greensboro, Pennsylvania

Scarce and Fine Large-Sized Tanware Pitcher, New Geneva or Greensboro, PA origin, circa 1885. H 8 3/4".

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Fine Tanware Flowerpot, New Geneva or Greensboro, circa 1885Fine Tanware Flowerpot, New Geneva or Greensboro, circa 1885Fine Tanware Flowerpot, New Geneva or Greensboro, circa 1885Fine Tanware Flowerpot, New Geneva or Greensboro, circa 1885

Fine Tanware Flowerpot, New Geneva or Greensboro, PA origin, circa 1885. This example retains its original free-swinging ring handles, often missing on this form. H 8" ; Diam. (at rim) 8 7/8".

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5 Gal. David Drake Stoneware Jar Inscribed 5 Gal. David Drake Stoneware Jar Inscribed 5 Gal. David Drake Stoneware Jar Inscribed 5 Gal. David Drake Stoneware Jar Inscribed 5 Gal. David Drake Stoneware Jar Inscribed 5 Gal. David Drake Stoneware Jar Inscribed 5 Gal. David Drake Stoneware Jar Inscribed 5 Gal. David Drake Stoneware Jar Inscribed 5 Gal. David Drake Stoneware Jar Inscribed

Exceptional Glaze. Five-Gallon Alkaline-Glazed Stoneware Jar, Inscribed "Lm / Aug 1. 1855," David Drake at Lewis Miles' Stony Bluff Manufactory, Horse Creek Valley, Edgefield District, SC, 1855. This example features a colorful, spotted glaze rarely seen in Drake's work, reminiscent of 19th century New England redware. H 14 1/4".

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Monumental David Drake Stoneware Jar (approximately 11 Gallons)Monumental David Drake Stoneware Jar (approximately 11 Gallons)Monumental David Drake Stoneware Jar (approximately 11 Gallons)Monumental David Drake Stoneware Jar (approximately 11 Gallons)Monumental David Drake Stoneware Jar (approximately 11 Gallons)Monumental David Drake Stoneware Jar (approximately 11 Gallons)Monumental David Drake Stoneware Jar (approximately 11 Gallons)Monumental David Drake Stoneware Jar (approximately 11 Gallons)

Monumental Eleven-Gallon Alkaline-Glazed Stoneware Jar, attributed to David Drake at Lewis Miles' Stony Bluff Manufactory, Horse Creek Valley, Edgefield District, SC, circa 1855. Exceptional size, exhibiting classic David Drake form. H 17 1/2".

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Exceedingly Rare and Important Morgan & Amoss (Baltimore) 1820 Stoneware Jar w/ Two-Sided Incised Bird DecorationExceedingly Rare and Important Morgan & Amoss (Baltimore) 1820 Stoneware Jar w/ Two-Sided Incised Bird DecorationExceedingly Rare and Important Morgan & Amoss (Baltimore) 1820 Stoneware Jar w/ Two-Sided Incised Bird DecorationExceedingly Rare and Important Morgan & Amoss (Baltimore) 1820 Stoneware Jar w/ Two-Sided Incised Bird DecorationExceedingly Rare and Important Morgan & Amoss (Baltimore) 1820 Stoneware Jar w/ Two-Sided Incised Bird DecorationExceedingly Rare and Important Morgan & Amoss (Baltimore) 1820 Stoneware Jar w/ Two-Sided Incised Bird DecorationExceedingly Rare and Important Morgan & Amoss (Baltimore) 1820 Stoneware Jar w/ Two-Sided Incised Bird DecorationExceedingly Rare and Important Morgan & Amoss (Baltimore) 1820 Stoneware Jar w/ Two-Sided Incised Bird Decoration

Maryland Masterwork. Exceedingly Rare and Important Stoneware Jar with Incised Bird-and-Floral Decorations, Incised "Morgan & Amoss / Makers / Baltimore / 1820," William Morgan and Thomas Amoss, Baltimore, MD, 1820. This delicately-potted and decorated jar is the only known example of incised stoneware bearing the signature of early Baltimore potters, William Morgan and Thomas Amoss. Famously illustrated on the cover of Ceramics in America 2005, it is regarded as one the most refined examples of American stoneware that we have ever offered. Potted with a light-colored clay exhibiting minimal "orange peel" to the surface, it was likely produced from a clay source advertised by Morgan and Amoss on August 25, 1820: "M & A have the satisfaction to inform their old customers as well as all others who purchase stone ware that they have lately purchased the exclusive privilege of two pits of fine clay, which upon trial has been found to make ware, which excels in beauty any thing of the kind now made, or perhaps ever was made in this country, out of which they intend to manufacture the most of their ware, as long as the pits will hold out."

Characteristic of Morgan and Amoss's best work, the jar features an elegant, thin-walled construction uncommon in American stoneware from any period. Its scarce open-handled form, is based on the Manhattan style, the standard of American stoneware production of the period, and was possibly influenced by the Remmeys' arrival in Baltimore eight years prior. Standard pieces produced by Morgan & Amoss have simplistic and less-decorative tab handles. The vessel's bird-and-floral motifs are also related to the Remmey style, but feature their own distinctive characteristics, most notable in the intricate, fully-enclosed incising of the flowers' petals. In addition, the birds, with their narrow heads, slender necks, and long legs, have an almost crane-like appearance- differing from typical Remmey avian motifs and giving the jar a decidedly more-formal appearance reminiscent of Chinese porcelain. The different decorations on each side of the jar, which include forward-facing and turned-head attitudes to the birds, reveal the decorator's proficiency and add artistic appeal to the vessel.

The incised signature on the underside ends with a very early 1820 date and the name of William Morgan's partner at the time, Thomas Amoss, a figure instrumental in both Baltimore and Richmond stoneware traditions. (While involved in his Baltimore partnership, Amoss also worked with potter, Samuel Frayser, at the former pottery of Richard Randolph along Four Mile Creek, near Richmond, from 1818-1821, and independently in the area until his death in 1822. Richmond pieces produced with forms and decorations related to Amoss's Baltimore work have survived.) Baltimore pieces produced at William Morgan's shop after Amoss's tenure, circa 1822-1827, include an incised birds-in-tree-decorated water cooler, which sold in Crocker Farm's July 20, 2013 auction, lot 1, setting a record at the time for a ceramic object made in the state of Maryland.

Equally rare and beautiful, this jar is emblematic of the heightened level of artistry found in Baltimore's early stoneware industry- arguably the zenith of American stoneware production. Literature: Illustrated on the cover of Ceramics in America 2005; also illustrated and discussed in Kille, "Distinguishing Marks and Flowering Designs: Baltimore's Utilitarian Stoneware Industry," Ceramics in America 2005, pp. 105-106, figs. 24, 25, 26. H 14 1/2".

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Exceptional HUBBELL & CHESEBRO, / GEDDES, N.Y (Syracuse) Stoneware Churn w/ Elaborate Cobalt Peacock DecorationExceptional HUBBELL & CHESEBRO, / GEDDES, N.Y (Syracuse) Stoneware Churn w/ Elaborate Cobalt Peacock DecorationExceptional HUBBELL & CHESEBRO, / GEDDES, N.Y (Syracuse) Stoneware Churn w/ Elaborate Cobalt Peacock Decoration

Rare Bird. Exceptional Five-Gallon Stoneware Churn with Elaborate Cobalt Peacock Decoration, Stamped 'HUBBELL & CHESEBRO, / GEDDES, N.Y.," circa 1870. Confidently-drawn by a Rochester, NY-trained decorator, this painterly rendering of a peacock, complete with crown and eye-decorated tail, ranks among the finest depictions of the bird that we have ever offered. The churn survives in excellent condition with striking color and contrast. H 17".

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Exceedingly Rare COWDEN & WILCOX / HARRISBURG, PA Stoneware Jar w/ Elaborate Swan-in-Wreath Decoration

Cowden Discovery. Exceedingly Rare Four-Gallon Stoneware Jar with Elaborate Cobalt Swan-in-Wreath Decoration, Stamped "COWDEN & WILCOX / HARRISBURG, PA," circa 1865. This recently-discovered jar features a previously-undocumented Cowden & Wilcox figural design. While swan motifs from this pottery typically feature a brushed bird in outline, this example represents the figure with slip cup decoration, including sawtoothed details within the bird's neck and a spiraled body embellished with spots. While swirled slip-trailing forming the body can be found in other bird motifs from the Northeastern U.S., most notably the iconic flying eagles of West Troy, such a treatment is otherwise unknown in the Harrisburg potting tradition. The inclusion of a wreath around the swan is also most unusual. Provenance: A fresh-to-the-market example, acquired in the Philadelphia area several years ago. H 14 1/4".

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Exceedingly Rare COWDEN & WILCOX / HARRISBURG, PA 3 Stoneware Jar with Goat Decoration

Cowden Stoneware at its Rarest. Exceedingly Rare and Important Three-Gallon Stoneware Jar with Cobalt Standing Goat Decoration, Stamped "COWDEN & WILCOX / HARRISBURG, PA," circa 1865. This jar's design of a goat with long horns and striped tail is believed to be unique in Central Pennsylvania stoneware production. While the goat is regarded as a classic image in American folk art- prized in its various depictions on forms such as weathervanes, carousel figures, and redware sculpture- few cobalt renderings of this animal in American stoneware have been documented. This design, applied with a slip cup with distinctive scalloped ground below, was executed by the same as-yet-unidentified decorator responsible for a small number of other important Cowden mammal designs, including a few deer and dogs. Arguably the most important example of Cowden & Wilcox stoneware to come to auction in the past several years. H 13 1/4".

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Six-Gallon COWDEN & WILCOX / HARRISBURG, PA Stoneware Grapes Crock

Six-Gallon Stoneware Jar with Cobalt Grapes Decoration, Stamped "COWDEN & WILCOX / HARRISBURG, PA," circa 1865. H 14 3/4".

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Profusely-Decorated Stoneware Profusely-Decorated Stoneware Profusely-Decorated Stoneware

Outstanding Four-Gallon Stoneware "Gin" Cooler with Profuse Cobalt Floral Decoration, Northeastern U.S origin, circa 1850. H 18".

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Outstanding Albany, NY Stoneware Bird Crock, circa 1860

Abstract Art. Outstanding Six-Quart Stoneware Crock with Elaborate Cobalt Bird Decoration, Stamped "ALBANY, N.Y.," probably O'Connell Pottery, Albany, NY, circa 1860. Provenance: Recently surfaced in North Carolina. H 7 3/4".

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Rare and Important Rare and Important Rare and Important

Extravagant Slip. Rare and Important Slip-Decorated Redware Loaf Dish, Inscribed "Washington & Lafayette," Norwalk, CT origin, circa 1824. Possibly made during Lafayette's famous return to America in 1824, this loaf dish features bold and prolific use of yellow slip, including a wonderful flourish on the W in Washington. Provenance: Skinner, Personal Collection of Lewis Scranton, May 21, 2106, lot 228. Dimensions: 15 3/8" x 10 5/8".

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Extremely Rare Extremely Rare Extremely Rare Extremely Rare Extremely Rare Extremely Rare Extremely Rare Extremely Rare Extremely Rare Extremely Rare

New York State Redware Discovery. Extremely Rare Slip-Decorated Redware Jar, Inscribed "Lemuel Rowell potter / 1835," Galesville, NY, 1835. A manufacturer of both redware and stoneware, Rowell is documented in Ketchum's Potters and Potteries of New York State as operating a pottery in Galesville, NY. Until the discovery of this jar, no signed examples of his work were known. Ownership of his pottery was succeeded by the more-well-known stoneware producers, Otto V. and W.A. Lewis. As relatively few signed examples of redware from this state have survived, this jar ranks among the most important examples of New York redware to come to auction in years. H 7 3/4".

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Extremely Rare and Important John Quincy Adams Stoneware Jar, W. GAY, Utica, NY, circa 1829Extremely Rare and Important John Quincy Adams Stoneware Jar, W. GAY, Utica, NY, circa 1829Extremely Rare and Important John Quincy Adams Stoneware Jar, W. GAY, Utica, NY, circa 1829Extremely Rare and Important John Quincy Adams Stoneware Jar, W. GAY, Utica, NY, circa 1829Extremely Rare and Important John Quincy Adams Stoneware Jar, W. GAY, Utica, NY, circa 1829

Presidential Pot. Exceedingly Rare and Important Stoneware Jar with Scalloped Rim and Cobalt Floral Decoration, Incised "J.Q. Adams / Wm. A. Gay," Stamped "W * GAY / UTICA," NY State origin, circa 1829. This jar was made to commemorate the sixth President of the United States, John Quincy Adams (1767-1848), who served from 1825 to 1829. Son of founding father, John Adams, he began his political career as a Federalist, but won the presidency as a Democratic-Republican and was later affiliated with the Whig Party. In the Election of 1824 against Andrew Jackson, Adams was successful throughout most of the Northeastern U.S., including New York, where this jar was made. Relatively few examples of American stoneware with president's names have survived, this example produced relatively early in the country's history. H 9".

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Exceptional J. REMMEY / NEW-YORK Stoneware Jar with Elaborate Incised and Impressed Tree DecorationExceptional J. REMMEY / NEW-YORK Stoneware Jar with Elaborate Incised and Impressed Tree DecorationExceptional J. REMMEY / NEW-YORK Stoneware Jar with Elaborate Incised and Impressed Tree DecorationExceptional J. REMMEY / NEW-YORK Stoneware Jar with Elaborate Incised and Impressed Tree Decoration

John Remmey Masterwork. Exceptional Two-Gallon Stoneware Jar with Elaborate Impressed and Incised Decoration, Stamped "J. REMMEY. / NEW-YORK," John Remmey, III, Manhattan, NY, early 19th century. This jar is the finest example of John Remmey stoneware that we have ever offered and among his finest signed pieces in existence. Decorated with an incised, Manhattan-style foliate motif below the maker's mark, this work includes wonderful impressed leaves with veining forming the upper portion of the design. Underscoring the maker's mark is a long, narrow elipse flanked by chain links. The reverse is exuberantly decorated with an incised plant bearing two styles of impressed leaves emanating from an incised stump. Two different-colored slips are used to decorate the jar: purplish-blue slip, likely composed of cobalt and manganese, highlights the maker's mark and design on the front and cobalt slip covers the design on the reverse and surrounds the handle terminals. John Remmey III, the grandson of the first member of the Remmey family to pot in America, Johannes Remmi, typically produced stoneware with more-simplistic incised decoration lacking any impressed embellishments. This jar's incising, featuring extremely rare stamped designs (likely inspired by his contemporary, Clarkson Crolius, Sr.), brings this work to an extraordinary level of artistry. Provenance: Ex-Collection Ernie Graf, Saratoga Springs, NY. H 10 1/8".

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Exceedingly Rare D. MORGAN / N. YORK Jar (David Morgan, Lower East Side, late 18th / early 19th century)Exceedingly Rare D. MORGAN / N. YORK Jar (David Morgan, Lower East Side, late 18th / early 19th century)Exceedingly Rare D. MORGAN / N. YORK Jar (David Morgan, Lower East Side, late 18th / early 19th century)

Exceedingly Rare and Important Three-Gallon Stoneware Jar with Impressed Decoration, Stamped "D. MORGAN / N. YORK," David Morgan, Corlears Hook, Manhattan, NY, circa 1800. Signed David Morgan stoneware of any kind is considered very rare. When found, his marked ware typically reads, "DAVID MORGAN / NEW YORK," and is decorated with a descending series of impressed swags with heart-shaped tassels interspersed. Pieces bearing this earlier stamp and decoration are considered exceptionally rare, with only a few surviving examples known. H 12 3/4".

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Outstanding Small-Sized Stoneware Presentation Jar w/ Incised Bird, att. Nicholas Van Wickle, Old Bridge or Manasquan, NJOutstanding Small-Sized Stoneware Presentation Jar w/ Incised Bird, att. Nicholas Van Wickle, Old Bridge or Manasquan, NJOutstanding Small-Sized Stoneware Presentation Jar w/ Incised Bird, att. Nicholas Van Wickle, Old Bridge or Manasquan, NJOutstanding Small-Sized Stoneware Presentation Jar w/ Incised Bird, att. Nicholas Van Wickle, Old Bridge or Manasquan, NJOutstanding Small-Sized Stoneware Presentation Jar w/ Incised Bird, att. Nicholas Van Wickle, Old Bridge or Manasquan, NJ

Outstanding Small-Sized Stoneware Presentation Jar with Incised Bird Decoration, Inscribed "R. MORFORD," attributed to Nicholas Van Wickle, Old Bridge or Manasquan, NJ, circa 1820's. H 7 3/4".

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Extremely Rare Water Cooler w/ Incised Double-Bird and Floral Decorations, att. Nicholas van Wickle, Manasquan, NJExtremely Rare Water Cooler w/ Incised Double-Bird and Floral Decorations, att. Nicholas van Wickle, Manasquan, NJExtremely Rare Water Cooler w/ Incised Double-Bird and Floral Decorations, att. Nicholas van Wickle, Manasquan, NJExtremely Rare Water Cooler w/ Incised Double-Bird and Floral Decorations, att. Nicholas van Wickle, Manasquan, NJ

Decoration and Form. Extremely Rare Stoneware Water Cooler with Incised Double-Bird and Floral Decorations, attributed to Nicholas van Wickle, Manasquan, NJ, circa 1825. An exceptionally rare form from this potting tradition, this cooler also features a highly unusual composition of two facing birds in the distinctive style of Nicholas van Wickle. This potter's typical products, when found, depict only one bird. The reverse features a delicately-incised tulip plant with overlapping flower petals and wavy leaves, uncommon in its style and intricacy for this region. (Of note, a well-known Van Wickle water cooler in the collection of the American Folk Art Museum bears an elaborate incised eagle on its front and an identical bird to those seen here on its reverse.) The combined form and elaborate incising of this piece rank this cooler among the most significant examples of related stoneware to come to auction in recent years. Provenance: A fresh-to-the-market example, recently-discovered in the Southwestern United States. H 15".

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Exceedingly Rare Pair of JOHN BELL (Waynesboro) Redware Spaniel Figures w/ Original Painted SurfacesExceedingly Rare Pair of JOHN BELL (Waynesboro) Redware Spaniel Figures w/ Original Painted SurfacesExceedingly Rare Pair of JOHN BELL (Waynesboro) Redware Spaniel Figures w/ Original Painted SurfacesExceedingly Rare Pair of JOHN BELL (Waynesboro) Redware Spaniel Figures w/ Original Painted SurfacesExceedingly Rare Pair of JOHN BELL (Waynesboro) Redware Spaniel Figures w/ Original Painted SurfacesExceedingly Rare Pair of JOHN BELL (Waynesboro) Redware Spaniel Figures w/ Original Painted SurfacesExceedingly Rare Pair of JOHN BELL (Waynesboro) Redware Spaniel Figures w/ Original Painted SurfacesExceedingly Rare Pair of JOHN BELL (Waynesboro) Redware Spaniel Figures w/ Original Painted SurfacesExceedingly Rare Pair of JOHN BELL (Waynesboro) Redware Spaniel Figures w/ Original Painted Surfaces

Form, Maker, and Surface. Exceedingly Rare and Important Pair of Redware Spaniel Figures in Original Paint, Both Stamped "JOHN BELL," Waynesboro, PA, circa 1840-1880. Arguably the finest pair of Bell family spaniel figures known, both survive in remarkable condition, retaining untouched black-and-white painted surfaces. Literature: Right-facing spaniel illustrated in Wiltshire, Folk Pottery of the Shenandoah Valley, p. 30, pl. 5. Exhibited: Right-facing spaniel exhibited at The Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Folk Art Museum, Williamsburg, VA, May 25-October 4, 1975. Provenance: Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates, The Collection of the Late John & Lil Palmer, April 5, 2014, 27. Right-Facing Spaniel- purchased from Bob and Carol Lewis, Frederick, MD; Sotheby's Parke Bernet, New York, NY, February 1, 1978, lot 2; red accession number, 1974.57, on underside. Left-Facing Spaniel-purchased from Tommy Ennis, Charlestown, WV; Nelson Myers, Greencastle, PA, 1987; Rick Hamilton, Hagerstown, MD, 1978; Ex-Collection Mrs. James A. (?), Quincy, PA. Early label on left-facing spaniel reads "Mrs. James A. ? . Quincy, Pa, / PO Box 20 / (before 1888)". H (of each) 9".

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Extremely Rare JOHN BELL / WAYNESBORO Profusely Decorated Stoneware Jug Inscribed Extremely Rare JOHN BELL / WAYNESBORO Profusely Decorated Stoneware Jug Inscribed Extremely Rare JOHN BELL / WAYNESBORO Profusely Decorated Stoneware Jug Inscribed Extremely Rare JOHN BELL / WAYNESBORO Profusely Decorated Stoneware Jug Inscribed Extremely Rare JOHN BELL / WAYNESBORO Profusely Decorated Stoneware Jug Inscribed Extremely Rare JOHN BELL / WAYNESBORO Profusely Decorated Stoneware Jug Inscribed Extremely Rare JOHN BELL / WAYNESBORO Profusely Decorated Stoneware Jug Inscribed

Bell Beauty. Exceptional Small-Sized Alkaline-Glazed Stoneware Jug with Exuberant Cobalt Floral Decoration, Inscribed "C.F. Bell," Stamped "JOHN BELL / WAYNESBORO'," PA origin, circa 1870. This work showcases Bell's proficiency with a variety of glaze treatments as well as the skillful brushwork of his son, Charles Frederick Bell. H 7 3/4".

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Very Rare JOHN BELL / WAYNESBORO (Pennsylvania) Redware CruetVery Rare JOHN BELL / WAYNESBORO (Pennsylvania) Redware CruetVery Rare JOHN BELL / WAYNESBORO (Pennsylvania) Redware CruetVery Rare JOHN BELL / WAYNESBORO (Pennsylvania) Redware CruetVery Rare JOHN BELL / WAYNESBORO (Pennsylvania) Redware Cruet

Very Rare Glazed Redware Cruet, Stamped "JOHN BELL / WAYNESBORO'," PA origin, circa 1850-1880. H 8".

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Outstanding Huntingdon County, PA Stoneware Lidded Sugar Bowl with Elaborate DecorationOutstanding Huntingdon County, PA Stoneware Lidded Sugar Bowl with Elaborate DecorationOutstanding Huntingdon County, PA Stoneware Lidded Sugar Bowl with Elaborate DecorationOutstanding Huntingdon County, PA Stoneware Lidded Sugar Bowl with Elaborate DecorationOutstanding Huntingdon County, PA Stoneware Lidded Sugar Bowl with Elaborate DecorationOutstanding Huntingdon County, PA Stoneware Lidded Sugar Bowl with Elaborate DecorationOutstanding Huntingdon County, PA Stoneware Lidded Sugar Bowl with Elaborate DecorationOutstanding Huntingdon County, PA Stoneware Lidded Sugar Bowl with Elaborate Decoration

Huntingdon County Masterwork. Outstanding Lidded Stoneware Sugar Bowl with Profuse Cobalt Decoration and Rope-Twist Handles, attributed to Jacob Greenland or E.B. Hyssong, Cassville, PA, circa 1855. Among the finest examples of Huntingdon County stoneware known. H (including lid) 5 3/4".

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Extremely Rare and Important Extremely Rare and Important Extremely Rare and Important Extremely Rare and Important Extremely Rare and Important Extremely Rare and Important

Rosetta Stone. Two-Gallon Stoneware Jar with Elaborate Cobalt Floral Decoration, Inscribed "Samuel Bradford / Maker / at Thomas Morgan / factory / 27 of March / 1835," Baltimore, MD, 1835. Thomas Morgan operated the oldest stoneware pottery in the city. Founded in 1793, Morgan's early works, none of which have been documented, were presumably undecorated or dipped in iron slip. By 1835, as evidenced by this jar, Morgan was producing stoneware with beautiful floral motifs based on decorations by local potter, David Parr, Sr. Morgan's shop would close in 1838, after over forty-five years in operation, after a kiln fire destroyed the pottery. The city council refused to allow him to rebuild his kiln. This jar is the only signed example of decorated stoneware known from Morgan's site, an important "rosetta stone" piece used to attribute future works, based on its form, decoration, and its distinctive capacity mark. It survives as one of the most heavily-inscribed examples of Baltimore stoneware known as it identifies not only the pottery it was made at, but the individual artist, Samuel Bradford, whose work would otherwise be lost to history. Literature: Illustrated and discussed in Kille, "Distinguishing Marks and Flowering Designs: Baltimore's Utilitarian Stoneware Industry," Ceramics in America 2005, pp. 100-101, figs. 14, 15. H 12".

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Exceptional B.C. Milburn, Alexandria, Virginia, Stoneware JarExceptional B.C. Milburn, Alexandria, Virginia, Stoneware JarExceptional B.C. Milburn, Alexandria, Virginia, Stoneware JarExceptional B.C. Milburn, Alexandria, Virginia, Stoneware JarExceptional B.C. Milburn, Alexandria, Virginia, Stoneware Jar

Fine Two-Gallon Stoneware Jar with Elaborate Slip-Trailed Cobalt Floral Decoration, Stamped "B.C. MILBURN / ALEXA," Alexandria, VA origin, circa 1850. Provenance: Recently discovered in Florida. H 12 1/2".

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Outstanding Chester Webster, Randolph County, NC Incised Bird Jug, c1825-35Outstanding Chester Webster, Randolph County, NC Incised Bird Jug, c1825-35Outstanding Chester Webster, Randolph County, NC Incised Bird Jug, c1825-35Outstanding Chester Webster, Randolph County, NC Incised Bird Jug, c1825-35Outstanding Chester Webster, Randolph County, NC Incised Bird Jug, c1825-35Outstanding Chester Webster, Randolph County, NC Incised Bird Jug, c1825-35Outstanding Chester Webster, Randolph County, NC Incised Bird Jug, c1825-35

In the Hartford Style. Fine and Very Rare Two-Gallon Stoneware Jug with Incised Bird Decoration, attributed to Chester Webster, Randolph County, NC, circa 1825-1835. Featuring an iron slip coating under a light salt glaze, this work was produced relatively early in the North Carolina tenure of Hartford, Connecticut-trained potter, Chester Webster. H 14 3/4".

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Very Unusual Very Unusual Very Unusual Very Unusual Very Unusual Very Unusual Very Unusual Very Unusual

Form, Size, and Surface. Extremely Rare Painted Redware Apple-Form Cider Cooler, Inscribed "BALDWIN'S CIDER," American, late 19th century. A visually-stunning and creative work, this cooler is one of only two examples of its kind that we are aware of. The spigot bears the hand-incised inscription, "PAT APLIED(sic) FOR." Literature: A closely-related work, at the time in the folk art collection of Barry Cohen, New York, NY, is illustrated and discussed in Reif, "Just Plain Folk: The Art of Everyday Objects," New York Times, June 17, 1990. The article focused on the sale of Cohen's collection in 1990. Reif writes, "The rarest object in the exhibition is an apple-shaped cider cooler, a redware precursor of Pop Art standing more than 16" tall. . . the price in the show- $17,500." H 17 1/2" ; Diam. 15".

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Rare 3 Gal. Isaac Gay, Union County, NC Stoneware Jar w/ Incised SignatureRare 3 Gal. Isaac Gay, Union County, NC Stoneware Jar w/ Incised SignatureRare 3 Gal. Isaac Gay, Union County, NC Stoneware Jar w/ Incised SignatureRare 3 Gal. Isaac Gay, Union County, NC Stoneware Jar w/ Incised SignatureRare 3 Gal. Isaac Gay, Union County, NC Stoneware Jar w/ Incised SignatureRare 3 Gal. Isaac Gay, Union County, NC Stoneware Jar w/ Incised Signature

Rare Three-Gallon Salt-Glazed Stoneware Jar, Incised "3 / I. Gay," Isaac Gay, Union County, NC, circa 1870. Distinctive form with depressed pocket handles. Provenance: A recently-surfaced example, which descended in the family of the consignor. H 14 1/2".

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Rare 1 Gal. Isaac Gay, Union County, NC Stoneware Jug w/ Incised SignatureRare 1 Gal. Isaac Gay, Union County, NC Stoneware Jug w/ Incised SignatureRare 1 Gal. Isaac Gay, Union County, NC Stoneware Jug w/ Incised SignatureRare 1 Gal. Isaac Gay, Union County, NC Stoneware Jug w/ Incised SignatureRare 1 Gal. Isaac Gay, Union County, NC Stoneware Jug w/ Incised SignatureRare 1 Gal. Isaac Gay, Union County, NC Stoneware Jug w/ Incised Signature

Rare One-Gallon Salt-Glazed Stoneware Jug, Incised "I. Gay," Isaac Gay, Union County, NC, circa 1870. Provenance: A recently-surfaced example, which descended in the family of the consignor. H 12 1/4".

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Exceedingly Rare DONALDSON (Denton County, Texas) Stoneware JarExceedingly Rare DONALDSON (Denton County, Texas) Stoneware Jar

Texas Rarity. One-Gallon Salt-Glazed Stoneware Jar, Stamped "DONALDSON," Denton County, TX origin, circa 1876. While the mark on this jar could refer to a previous enterprise operated by Thomas Jefferson Donaldson (or another member of his family), it was most likely made during Donaldson's proprietorship of what had been John W. Cranston's stoneware manufactory, beginning about 1876. (Thomas J. Donaldson is the same man who about 1860 made stoneware under a partnership with Augustus H. Serren; a surviving jar marked "SERREN & DONALDSON" was sold in Crocker Farm's Spring 2021 auction, lot 177, and its form is remarkably similar to that seen here.) As detailed in Leslie Bucher's research notes for the Museum of Fine Arts Houston, Donaldson was the nephew of Nancy Violet Donaldson Cranston, wife of John W. Cranston. After John's death in 1867, the shop was run by Nancy and perhaps later by their son, George, who sold the pottery in 1875. Donaldson purchased it in 1876. This is the first jar we have seen bearing the mark "DONALDSON." Recently surfaced in Dallas, TX. H 9 3/4".

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Rare Canfield, Ohio 1845 Stoneware Jar w/ Multiple Incised SlogansRare Canfield, Ohio 1845 Stoneware Jar w/ Multiple Incised SlogansRare Canfield, Ohio 1845 Stoneware Jar w/ Multiple Incised SlogansRare Canfield, Ohio 1845 Stoneware Jar w/ Multiple Incised SlogansRare Canfield, Ohio 1845 Stoneware Jar w/ Multiple Incised SlogansRare Canfield, Ohio 1845 Stoneware Jar w/ Multiple Incised SlogansRare Canfield, Ohio 1845 Stoneware Jar w/ Multiple Incised SlogansRare Canfield, Ohio 1845 Stoneware Jar w/ Multiple Incised SlogansRare Canfield, Ohio 1845 Stoneware Jar w/ Multiple Incised SlogansRare Canfield, Ohio 1845 Stoneware Jar w/ Multiple Incised Slogans

Rare Albany-Slip-Glazed Stoneware Pitcher with Elaborate Incised Inscriptions, Canfield, OH origin, 1845. Profusely incised with the following inscriptions: Salt river, Scrabble, holar(?), peace and poverty, gingerbred(sic) and appled dumplins, hard cider gose well with molasses, timothy tickle pitcher, peter grievus the gimblet maker, pigsfoot soup, A Sailor / is the Jack / of hearts, and Canfield 1845. Surface covered in a brown Albany slip glaze. Among the most wonderfully inscribed examples of American stoneware that we have offered. H 7 1/4".

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Outstanding HORRAY / FOR / GRANT Stoneware Crock, Ohio, circa 1868 (Ulysses S. Grant)Outstanding HORRAY / FOR / GRANT Stoneware Crock, Ohio, circa 1868 (Ulysses S. Grant)Outstanding HORRAY / FOR / GRANT Stoneware Crock, Ohio, circa 1868 (Ulysses S. Grant)Outstanding HORRAY / FOR / GRANT Stoneware Crock, Ohio, circa 1868 (Ulysses S. Grant)Outstanding HORRAY / FOR / GRANT Stoneware Crock, Ohio, circa 1868 (Ulysses S. Grant)Outstanding HORRAY / FOR / GRANT Stoneware Crock, Ohio, circa 1868 (Ulysses S. Grant)

Variety of rare political-themed stoneware with inscriptions for Ulysses S. Grant, Andrew Jackson, William Henry Harrison and John Tyler.

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Rare World s Fair Stoneware Train Bank w/ New York Advertising, White s Pottery, Utica, NY, 1893Rare World s Fair Stoneware Train Bank w/ New York Advertising, White s Pottery, Utica, NY, 1893Rare World s Fair Stoneware Train Bank w/ New York Advertising, White s Pottery, Utica, NY, 1893Rare World s Fair Stoneware Train Bank w/ New York Advertising, White s Pottery, Utica, NY, 1893Rare World s Fair Stoneware Train Bank w/ New York Advertising, White s Pottery, Utica, NY, 1893

Very Rare World's Fair Stoneware Train Bank with New York Advertising, attributed to the White's Pottery, Utica, NY, 1893. Inscribed on the front in embossed lettering, "WORLD'S FAIR / MY EXPENSES TO / CHICAGO / PAT APPLIED FOR." Reverse impressed with the advertising, "COMPLEMENTS(sic) / SMITH CRAY & C. / CLOTHIERS / NEW YORK & BROOKLYN." Only the second White's Utica train bank that we have ever offered, this example including rarely-seen advertising for a New York clothier. Among the most iconic White's molded forms in existence.

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Anna Pottery 1884 Salt-Glazed Stoneware Pig Bottle w/ Anna Pottery 1884 Salt-Glazed Stoneware Pig Bottle w/ Anna Pottery 1884 Salt-Glazed Stoneware Pig Bottle w/ Anna Pottery 1884 Salt-Glazed Stoneware Pig Bottle w/ Anna Pottery 1884 Salt-Glazed Stoneware Pig Bottle w/

Fine Anna Pottery Salt-Glazed Stoneware "Railroad and River Guide" Pig Flask with Incised Map, Signed and Dated "By Anna Pottery / 1884," Wallace and Cornwall Kirkpatrick, Anna, IL, 1884. Excellent color and crisp incising, featuring Anna Pottery's best penmanship.

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Fine Albany-Glazed Anna Pottery Fine Albany-Glazed Anna Pottery Fine Albany-Glazed Anna Pottery Fine Albany-Glazed Anna Pottery Fine Albany-Glazed Anna Pottery

Fine Anna Pottery Albany-Glazed "Railroad and River Guide" Pig Flask, Wallace and Cornwall Kirkpatrick, Anna, IL, circa 1880.

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Rare Multi-Glazed Redware Canister, attrib. S. Bell & Sons or J. Eberly & Co., Strasburg, VA, c1890Rare Multi-Glazed Redware Canister, attrib. S. Bell & Sons or J. Eberly & Co., Strasburg, VA, c1890Rare Multi-Glazed Redware Canister, attrib. S. Bell & Sons or J. Eberly & Co., Strasburg, VA, c1890

Variety of fine multi-glazed redware objects from Strasburg, Virginia.

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