Fall 2020 Auction Featured Photos

Important Presentation Cooler w/ Elaborate Incised Ship Design, attrib. Abial Price, South Amboy, NJ, Dated 1839Important Presentation Cooler w/ Elaborate Incised Ship Design, attrib. Abial Price, South Amboy, NJ, Dated 1839Important Presentation Cooler w/ Elaborate Incised Ship Design, attrib. Abial Price, South Amboy, NJ, Dated 1839Important Presentation Cooler w/ Elaborate Incised Ship Design, attrib. Abial Price, South Amboy, NJ, Dated 1839Important Presentation Cooler w/ Elaborate Incised Ship Design, attrib. Abial Price, South Amboy, NJ, Dated 1839Important Presentation Cooler w/ Elaborate Incised Ship Design, attrib. Abial Price, South Amboy, NJ, Dated 1839Important Presentation Cooler w/ Elaborate Incised Ship Design, attrib. Abial Price, South Amboy, NJ, Dated 1839

American Ceramic Masterpiece. Outstanding and Important Four-Gallon Stoneware Presentation Cooler with Incised Ship Decoration, Inscribed “John B. Wilson” and Dated “1839,” attributed to Abial Price, South Amboy, New Jersey, 1839. This work features one of the finest renderings of a sailing ship in American-made ceramics, noteworthy in its size and detail. The incised decoration, spanning an impressive 9 1/4" tall by 12" long, includes intricate and exceptionally-deep carving to the vessel's sails, sawtoothed embellishments to the gunwale, numerous portholes, and three waving flags. The distinctive floral motif on the reverse indicates it was made by the New-Jersey-trained potter, Abial Price, of the illustrious Price family of potters, which included father, Ebenezer, and grandfather, Xerxes, of South Amboy. This maritime masterwork is easily the finest example of New Jersey stoneware that we have ever offered and among the finest surviving works from a state integral in the development of the American salt-glazed stoneware tradition. Provenance: Ex-Leigh Keno, New York, NY. H 16 1/2".

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Outstanding Clark & Fox (Athens, NY) SPIRITS OF TURPENTINE Cooler for E.S. Fox s Brother-in-LawOutstanding Clark & Fox (Athens, NY) SPIRITS OF TURPENTINE Cooler for E.S. Fox s Brother-in-LawOutstanding Clark & Fox (Athens, NY) SPIRITS OF TURPENTINE Cooler for E.S. Fox s Brother-in-LawOutstanding Clark & Fox (Athens, NY) SPIRITS OF TURPENTINE Cooler for E.S. Fox s Brother-in-Law

Outstanding Three-Gallon Stoneware Presentation Water Cooler with Cobalt Floral Decoration, Impressed "SPIRITS OF TURPENTINE / W.H. Crandell," Stamped "CLARK & FOX / ATHENS," NY State origin, circa 1829-1843. Featuring a stylish form and rare subject matter with 1 1/4" tall lettering, this cooler is among the finest examples of signed Nathan Clark & Ethan Fox stoneware known. The name, "W.H. Crandell," is underscored by Clark's distinctive coggled circle motif, typically seen on this potter's inkwells. H 15 1/2".

Dr. Wilson H. Crandell was the brother-in-law of Ethan Fox and an Illinois physician. As part of various period medical treatments, he would have used Spirits of Turpentine on a regular basis, and this elaborate cooler would have been made as a gift to sit in his office.

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Exceedingly Rare and Historically Significant Stoneware Flask w/ Incised Flag and Election of 1868 Inscriptions (Grant / Colfax vs. Seymour / Blair)Exceedingly Rare and Historically Significant Stoneware Flask w/ Incised Flag and Election of 1868 Inscriptions (Grant / Colfax vs. Seymour / Blair)Exceedingly Rare and Historically Significant Stoneware Flask w/ Incised Flag and Election of 1868 Inscriptions (Grant / Colfax vs. Seymour / Blair)Exceedingly Rare and Historically Significant Stoneware Flask w/ Incised Flag and Election of 1868 Inscriptions (Grant / Colfax vs. Seymour / Blair)Exceedingly Rare and Historically Significant Stoneware Flask w/ Incised Flag and Election of 1868 Inscriptions (Grant / Colfax vs. Seymour / Blair)

Political Flask. Exceedingly Rare and Historically Significant Stoneware Flask with Incised Flag and Presidential Election of 1868 Inscriptions, OH origin, 1868. The flask was made shortly after the U.S. Presidential Election of 1868, in which Republican candidate and former Union General, Ulysses S. Grant, defeated the Democratic candidate and New York Governor, Horatio Seymour. One side of the flask celebrates the victory of Grant, an Ohio native, in his home state on Election Day with the words, "Grant / 45000 in / Ohio / Nov 3rd / 1868". The other side mocks the defeated Seymour with "H / C=Mour / will meat(sic) / my Friends up / Salt River / Nov 4th / 1868." The term "meet. . up Salt River” is a slogan dating as early as 1827, which to be used to symbolize political defeat. Salt River runs through Kentucky and empties into the Ohio River. As the Ohio River was the main travel route in the region, to take Salt River instead would mean to follow a wayward and treacherous path that would leave you lost or worse. One side of the flask features an incised design of an American flag bearing the names, "Grant / Colfax," for President Ulysses S. Grant and his Vice-President-Elect, Schuyler Colfax. The initials, "MOB," at the shoulder possibly refer to the flask's maker or owner. H 8 1/2".

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Exceedingly Rare Paul Cushman (Albany, NY, c1812) Stoneware Jar Inscribed Exceedingly Rare Paul Cushman (Albany, NY, c1812) Stoneware Jar Inscribed Exceedingly Rare Paul Cushman (Albany, NY, c1812) Stoneware Jar Inscribed Exceedingly Rare Paul Cushman (Albany, NY, c1812) Stoneware Jar Inscribed Exceedingly Rare Paul Cushman (Albany, NY, c1812) Stoneware Jar Inscribed

New York State History in Clay. Exceedingly Rare and Important Three-Gallon Stoneware Jar with Scalloped Handles and Cobalt Inscription, "Coopers:town," Stamped "PAUL : CUSHMANS," Albany, NY, circa 1812. Cooperstown was founded by William Cooper (1754-1809), a merchant, developer, and judge, who also served two terms in the United States Congress representing Otsego County and Central New York. Cooper was also the father of James Fenimore Cooper (1789-1851), well-known author of several works of fiction, including The Last of the Mohicans. William Cooper originally established the town of Cooperstown in 1786 as the "Village of Otsego," as it was built of Otsego Lake. The village was incorporated in 1807, and the name was officially changed to Cooperstown in 1812 after its founder, who had died in Albany in 1809. It is believed that this jar was made to commemorate the renaming of the town and dates to the year 1812. Note the use of a colon between "Coopers" and "town" as seen on the coggled maker's mark, "PAUL : CUSHMANS." Of the town he founded, Cooper once wrote, "This was the first settlement I made, and the first attempted after the Revolution; it was, of course, attended with the greatest difficulties; nevertheless, to its success many others have owed their origin. It was besides the roughest land in all the state, and the most difficult of cultivation of all that had been settled; but for many years past it has produced everything necessary to the support and comfort of man." This work is the finest example of Paul Cushman stoneware to come to auction in years, featuring unusually bright color for the maker and highly unusual scalloped carving to the handles. H 15".

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Extremely Rare Thomas Downing (New York) Oyster Jar attrib. Clarkson CroliusExtremely Rare Thomas Downing (New York) Oyster Jar attrib. Clarkson CroliusExtremely Rare Thomas Downing (New York) Oyster Jar attrib. Clarkson CroliusExtremely Rare Thomas Downing (New York) Oyster Jar attrib. Clarkson CroliusExtremely Rare Thomas Downing (New York) Oyster Jar attrib. Clarkson CroliusExtremely Rare Thomas Downing (New York) Oyster Jar attrib. Clarkson Crolius

African-American Ceramic History. Extremely Rare and Important Stoneware Oyster Jar, Stamped "T. DOWNING'S / PICKLED / OYSTERS, / NO. 5 BROAD STREET, / NEW-YORK," attributed to Clarkson Crolius, Manhattan, NY, circa 1830's. This example uses a font closely-related to that seen on signed pieces of Clarkson Crolius, Sr. stoneware from Manhattan; additionally, the exact quality of the Albany glaze is a match for signed Crolius ware. This oyster jar is the first that we have seen bearing this exact type face. Typical Thomas Downing jars feature a different, cruder font that matches the work of the Brooklyn stoneware shop of T.G. Boone. A great new discovery, made by America's preeminent stoneware potter of the time period for its preeminent oysterman. H 7 1/2".

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Extremely Rare Decker Pottery (Tennessee) Salesman s Sample Grave MarkerExtremely Rare Decker Pottery (Tennessee) Salesman s Sample Grave MarkerExtremely Rare Decker Pottery (Tennessee) Salesman s Sample Grave MarkerExtremely Rare Decker Pottery (Tennessee) Salesman s Sample Grave MarkerExtremely Rare Decker Pottery (Tennessee) Salesman s Sample Grave Marker

Extremely Rare Stoneware Salesman's Sample Grave Marker, Stamped "T.R. KILE / BORN / AUG 3, 1700. / DIED / AUG. 3, 1800," attributed to the Decker Pottery, Chucky Valley, TN, late 19th century. The marker's identical birth and death dates, set exactly one-hundred years apart, indicate this piece was made as a sample for prospective customers. H 12".

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Exceedingly Rare PARR & BURLAND / BALTIMORE Stoneware Cooler (1815-1821)Exceedingly Rare PARR & BURLAND / BALTIMORE Stoneware Cooler (1815-1821)Exceedingly Rare PARR & BURLAND / BALTIMORE Stoneware Cooler (1815-1821)Exceedingly Rare PARR & BURLAND / BALTIMORE Stoneware Cooler (1815-1821)Exceedingly Rare PARR & BURLAND / BALTIMORE Stoneware Cooler (1815-1821)

The Earliest Signed Southern Stoneware Water Cooler. Exceedingly Rare Four-Gallon Cobalt-Decorated Stoneware Water Cooler, Stamped "PARR & BURLAND / BALTIMORE," David Parr, Sr. and James Burland, Baltimore, MD, circa 1815-1821. The rarity of this form for the time period is evidenced by the intriguing placement of the bunghole on the side of the vessel. Few examples are known bearing this stamp, the only maker's mark used by the influential Baltimore potter, David Parr, Sr. H 16 1/2".

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Rare BAECHER / WINCHESTER (Anthony Bacher) Shenandoah Valley Lidded Redware Sugar BowlRare BAECHER / WINCHESTER (Anthony Bacher) Shenandoah Valley Lidded Redware Sugar BowlRare BAECHER / WINCHESTER (Anthony Bacher) Shenandoah Valley Lidded Redware Sugar BowlRare BAECHER / WINCHESTER (Anthony Bacher) Shenandoah Valley Lidded Redware Sugar BowlRare BAECHER / WINCHESTER (Anthony Bacher) Shenandoah Valley Lidded Redware Sugar BowlRare BAECHER / WINCHESTER (Anthony Bacher) Shenandoah Valley Lidded Redware Sugar BowlRare BAECHER / WINCHESTER (Anthony Bacher) Shenandoah Valley Lidded Redware Sugar Bowl

Iconic Shenandoah Valley Form. Rare Glazed Redware Sugar Bowl with Bird-Finialed Lid, Stamped "BAECHER / WINCHESTER," Anthony Bacher, Winchester, VA, circa 1880. This example, surviving in strong condition for the maker, includes an unusual leaf or fish in the bird's beak. H 5 3/4".

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Extremely Rare Adam Kern Shenandoah Valley Redware Pitcher and Bowl Set (Winchester, VA or Thurmont, MD)Extremely Rare Adam Kern Shenandoah Valley Redware Pitcher and Bowl Set (Winchester, VA or Thurmont, MD)Extremely Rare Adam Kern Shenandoah Valley Redware Pitcher and Bowl Set (Winchester, VA or Thurmont, MD)Extremely Rare Adam Kern Shenandoah Valley Redware Pitcher and Bowl Set (Winchester, VA or Thurmont, MD)Extremely Rare Adam Kern Shenandoah Valley Redware Pitcher and Bowl Set (Winchester, VA or Thurmont, MD)Extremely Rare Adam Kern Shenandoah Valley Redware Pitcher and Bowl Set (Winchester, VA or Thurmont, MD)

Shenandoah Rarity. Extremely Rare Shenandoah Valley Redware Pitcher and Bowl Set, Inscribed "A. Kern," Adam Kern, Winchester, VA or Mechanicstown (now Thurmont), MD, circa 1881-1883. This beautifully-glazed pitcher and bowl set features an unusual, small-sized bowl and the incised signature, "A. Kern," on the underside of each vessel. The distinctive glaze is closely-related to that seen on a few surviving flowerpots bearing the mark, "BAECHER & KERN / WINCHESTER, VA," made during Adam Kern's parternship with Anthony Bacher in 1883. According to Comstock's The Pottery of the Shenandoah Valley Region, Kern, like Bacher, was a native of Bavaria. He was employed at the Big Hunting Creek Pottery in Mechanicstown, MD in 1882, the year it closed, while it was under the ownership of J.E. Simons. In 1883, he moved to Frederick County, Virginia to become Anthony Bacher's partner. An advertisement noted in Comstock reads, "We are requested to announce that Mr. Anthony Bacher, the well known Potter has taken in as partner, Mr. Adam Kern of Pennsylvania who is a native of Baveria, Germany and a skilled potter. The new firm is preparing to do an extensive business the coming season, as they expect to manufacture pots and enough earthen-ware to supply the entire Valley." This partnership, however, was very short-lived, dissolving by 1884, when Kern moved to Pennsylvania (Comstock, p. 430). This pitcher and bowl set is the only example of this prized form that we have seen by Kern as well as the only script-signed piece by this potter that we are aware of. H (of pitcher) 11 1/4"; H (of bowl) 5 1/8" ; Diam. (of bowl) 12 1/4".

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Exceptional Large-Sized Redware Sugar Bowl w/ Profuse Slip Decoration, probably Berks County, PAExceptional Large-Sized Redware Sugar Bowl w/ Profuse Slip Decoration, probably Berks County, PAExceptional Large-Sized Redware Sugar Bowl w/ Profuse Slip Decoration, probably Berks County, PAExceptional Large-Sized Redware Sugar Bowl w/ Profuse Slip Decoration, probably Berks County, PAExceptional Large-Sized Redware Sugar Bowl w/ Profuse Slip Decoration, probably Berks County, PA

Exceptional Large-Sized Redware Sugar Bowl with Profuse Slip Decoration, PA origin, probably Berks County, circa 1840-1880. H 6" ; Diam. 8 1/4".

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Exceptional Glazed WM. W. BURCHNELL / LONDON (Ohio) Redware JarExceptional Glazed WM. W. BURCHNELL / LONDON (Ohio) Redware JarExceptional Glazed WM. W. BURCHNELL / LONDON (Ohio) Redware JarExceptional Glazed WM. W. BURCHNELL / LONDON (Ohio) Redware JarExceptional Glazed WM. W. BURCHNELL / LONDON (Ohio) Redware Jar

Morgantown Influence. Exceptional Glazed Redware Jar with Profuse Copper Slip Decoration, Stamped "WM. W. BURCHNELL / LONDON," Madison County, Ohio, circa 1835. William Burchnell was evidently trained in Morgantown, Virginia (now West Virginia), and joined fellow Morgantown potter, James M. Thompson, Jr., in London, Ohio by 1830, establishing a pottery on the site of the town's Presbyterian Church. This jar is Burchnell's finest known work. H 6 3/4".

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Exceptional Chester Webster, Randolph County, NC Stoneware PitcherExceptional Chester Webster, Randolph County, NC Stoneware PitcherExceptional Chester Webster, Randolph County, NC Stoneware PitcherExceptional Chester Webster, Randolph County, NC Stoneware PitcherExceptional Chester Webster, Randolph County, NC Stoneware PitcherExceptional Chester Webster, Randolph County, NC Stoneware PitcherExceptional Chester Webster, Randolph County, NC Stoneware PitcherExceptional Chester Webster, Randolph County, NC Stoneware PitcherExceptional Chester Webster, Randolph County, NC Stoneware Pitcher

Southern Incising. Exceptional Half-Gallon Stoneware Pitcher with Profuse Incised Bird, Floral, and Potted Plant Motifs, attributed to Chester Webster, Randolph County, NC, circa 1875. This high-styled pitcher is decorated in the incised tradition of Hartford, Connecticut, brought to North Carolina by the Websters circa 1818. Meticulously-decorated with bird, floral, geometric, and drape motifs, this work also exhibits a high level of craftmanship in its potting, revealed in its thin-walled construction, elaborate tooling, and refined spout modeled after Staffordshire china. Provenance: Illustrated and discussed in Quincy and Samuel Scarborough, North Carolina Decorated Stoneware: The Webster School of Folk Potters, p. 59, fig. 61. H 8 1/8".

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Monumental J. D. & T. W. CRAVEN Stoneware Water Cooler Inscribed Monumental J. D. & T. W. CRAVEN Stoneware Water Cooler Inscribed Monumental J. D. & T. W. CRAVEN Stoneware Water Cooler Inscribed Monumental J. D. & T. W. CRAVEN Stoneware Water Cooler Inscribed Monumental J. D. & T. W. CRAVEN Stoneware Water Cooler Inscribed Monumental J. D. & T. W. CRAVEN Stoneware Water Cooler Inscribed

Craven Family Masterpiece. Monumental Twelve-Gallon Stoneware Cooler with Cobalt Inscription, "Moore Co. / NC.," Stamped "J.D. & T.W. CRAVEN," Jacob Dorris Craven (1824-1895) and Thomas Wesley Craven (1829-1858), Moore County, NC origin, circa 1856-1858. This antebellum Southern cooler of enormous capacity proudly commemorates the vessel's county of origin in cobalt brushwork, a decorative treatment rarely seen in North Carolina stoneware. Exemplary in its form, size, and cobalt inscription, this work, made during the short-lived partnership of brothers, Jacob Dorris and Thomas Wesley Craven, is among the finest examples of Craven family stoneware to come to auction in years. H 28 1/2".

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Exceptional Ernest Galloway, Paducah, KY Stoneware Face JugExceptional Ernest Galloway, Paducah, KY Stoneware Face JugExceptional Ernest Galloway, Paducah, KY Stoneware Face JugExceptional Ernest Galloway, Paducah, KY Stoneware Face Jug

Southern Face Jug. Outstanding Albany-Slip-Glazed Stoneware Face Jug, Signed "E. Galloway. / Paducah, KY.," Ernest Galloway, Paducah, KY, early 2oth century. This face jug is among the finest examples of the form produced in the state of Kentucky. As few American face vessels are signed, this jug serves as a rosetta stone for attributing other works to this maker. Its highly-expressive face is closely-related that commonly seen on alkaline-glazed face vessels produced decades prior in South Carolina's Edgefield District. H 10".

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Exceptional Tennessee Stoneware Presentation Stoneware Harvest Jug, Exceptional Tennessee Stoneware Presentation Stoneware Harvest Jug, Exceptional Tennessee Stoneware Presentation Stoneware Harvest Jug, Exceptional Tennessee Stoneware Presentation Stoneware Harvest Jug, Exceptional Tennessee Stoneware Presentation Stoneware Harvest Jug, Exceptional Tennessee Stoneware Presentation Stoneware Harvest Jug,

Exceptional Presentation Stoneware Harvest Jug, Inscribed in Raised Letters "C.W.H.," Middle Tennessee origin, fourth quarter 19th century. This imaginatively-decorated form includes applied studs, screwheads, and initials as well as its original lid. H 12 1/2".

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Extremely Rare and Important Extremely Rare and Important Extremely Rare and Important Extremely Rare and Important Extremely Rare and Important

Rarest of the Rare. Important Three-Gallon Stoneware Jar with Incised Decoration, Inscribed "H.R. Marshall / Maker / Baltimore / 1822," Hugh Robbins Marshall, Baltimore, MD, 1822. Hugh R. Marshall learned the potter's trade in Baltimore from Thomas Morgan and briefly conducted his own pottery on Liberty Street circa 1822. During this time, it is likely that Marshall was operating at the shop of William Amoss, while Amoss was in Richmond, Virginia tending to the estate of his deceased brother, the Baltimore and Richmond potter, Thomas Amoss. Marshall was later associated with Elisha Parr's pottery on Pitt Street. Among the rarest Southern or Mid-Atlantic maker's marks that we are aware of, with roughly five intact pieces bearing this stamp known. Marshall has gained notoriety in recent years with the discovery of a pottery he established in Fredericksburg, Virginia, in 1831. This site, which was also occupied by the Cornwall, NY-trained potter, Francis Hamilton Bell, yielded sherds bearing the stamp, "H.R. MARSHALL / Fred'g, Va." Additionally, later sherds excavated at the Rockbridge Baths Pottery in Rockbridge County, Virginia bearing the incised inscription, "Hugh Marshall / Factor" and "Hugh Marshall / Manufactor" indicate his involvement in a third operation. Recent research also indicates Marshall operated a pottery in Lynchburg, VA. Together, this evidence suggests that Marshall was a highly-active, and possibly influential, potter, despite a paucity of signed work. To our knowledge, this jar is the only surviving piece of hand-signed stoneware produced by Marshall. The style of signature is closely-related to that seen on pieces made by his Baltimore contemporaries, William Morgan and Thomas Amoss of Pitt Street. The incised motif at the shoulder shares commonalities with the Manhattan, NY potting tradition, by which much of Baltimore's early stoneware was inspired. Literature: Illustrated and discussed in Kille, "Distinguishing Marks and Flowering Designs: Baltimore's Utilitarian Stoneware Industry," Ceramics in America 2005, pp. 98, figs. 7-8.

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Fine B.C. MILBURN / ALEXA (Alexandria, VA) One-and-a-Half-Gallon Stoneware Jar, Illustrated on Cover of Wilder

Cover Piece. Fine One-and-a-Half-Gallon Stoneware Jar with Slip-Trailed Cobalt Floral Decoration, Stamped "B.C. MILBURN / ALEXA," VA origin, circa 1850. Literature: Illustrated on the cover of Eddie L. Wilder, Alexandria, VA Pottery: 1792-1876.

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Rare Strasburg, VA Redware Pitcher w/ Applied Bird and Floral Design, probably HickersonRare Strasburg, VA Redware Pitcher w/ Applied Bird and Floral Design, probably HickersonRare Strasburg, VA Redware Pitcher w/ Applied Bird and Floral Design, probably HickersonRare Strasburg, VA Redware Pitcher w/ Applied Bird and Floral Design, probably HickersonRare Strasburg, VA Redware Pitcher w/ Applied Bird and Floral Design, probably Hickerson

Exceedingly Rare Manganese-Decorated Pitcher with Applied Bird and Floral Decoration, Strasburg, VA origin, circa 1895. Literature: For a closely-related example, see Rice and Stoudt, The Shenandoah Pottery, p. 138, fig. 172. Provenance: A recently-discovered example, which descended in the Keister family, having been collected from the root cellar of "Great Grandma Keister" in Cumberland, MD. H 8".

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Extremely Rare Stoneware Jar w/ Cobalt Federal Shield Decoration, probably Kentucky, c1825-40Extremely Rare Stoneware Jar w/ Cobalt Federal Shield Decoration, probably Kentucky, c1825-40

Extremely Rare One-Gallon Stoneware Jar with Cobalt Federal Shield Decoration, Ohio River Valley origin, probably KY origin, circa 1825-1840. While scarce in 19th century stoneware in general, shield designs are extremely rare on pieces from this region. The boldly-brushed image on this jar is complemented by an appealing ovoid form with reductive tab handles, indicating an early period of manufacture. Provenance: Ex-John and Lil Palmer Collection, Purcellville, VA.

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Five-Gallon DH (Daniel Hartsoe, Lincoln County, North Carolina) Stoneware JarFive-Gallon DH (Daniel Hartsoe, Lincoln County, North Carolina) Stoneware JarFive-Gallon DH (Daniel Hartsoe, Lincoln County, North Carolina) Stoneware JarFive-Gallon DH (Daniel Hartsoe, Lincoln County, North Carolina) Stoneware JarFive-Gallon DH (Daniel Hartsoe, Lincoln County, North Carolina) Stoneware Jar

Scarce Five-Gallon Alkaline-Glazed Stoneware Jar, Stamped "DH," Daniel Hartsoe, Lincoln County, NC, circa 1875. This large-sized example of Hartsoe's work includes darker glazing to the pocket handles. H 16 1/4".

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Outstanding Rope-Handled Redware Jar w/ Sgraffito Decoration att. Vickers Pottery, Chester County, PAOutstanding Rope-Handled Redware Jar w/ Sgraffito Decoration att. Vickers Pottery, Chester County, PAOutstanding Rope-Handled Redware Jar w/ Sgraffito Decoration att. Vickers Pottery, Chester County, PAOutstanding Rope-Handled Redware Jar w/ Sgraffito Decoration att. Vickers Pottery, Chester County, PA

Fine Sgraffito-Decorated Redware Jar with Pinwheel Motifs and Rope-Twist Handles, Eastern Pennsylvania origin, probably Vickers Family, Chester County, PA, first quarter 19th century. H 8".

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Extremely Rare Extremely Rare Extremely Rare Extremely Rare Extremely Rare

Folk Art Horse. Outstanding Stoneware Jug with Brushed Cobalt Horse Decoration, Inscribed "old cherry," probably Brown Brothers, Huntington, Long Island, NY, third quarter 19th century. While most Brown Brothers epigraph pieces feature inscriptions in all capital letters, this family did use lower-case lettering on redware plates. The similarity in penmanship to the word, "old," on this jug and the word, "cloud," in the Browns' well-known "Flying Cloud" slip-decorated redware plate is noteworthy. This detail, coupled with the form (documented in the Browns' work), and the provenance, indicate this jug is likely a Brown Brothers piece. Figural-decorated pieces from this pottery are exceedingly rare. The term "old cherry" likely refers to a 19th century brandy variety called "Old Cherry," which the jug was made to hold. Provenance: This jug includes an old piece of tape on underside, "MRS. E. JANE SMITH '76 / Brown Bros L.I." H 9 1/2" ; Diam. (at base) 8 5/8".

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Exceedingly Rare & Important Remmey, Philadelphia Stoneware Face JugExceedingly Rare & Important Remmey, Philadelphia Stoneware Face JugExceedingly Rare & Important Remmey, Philadelphia Stoneware Face JugExceedingly Rare & Important Remmey, Philadelphia Stoneware Face JugExceedingly Rare & Important Remmey, Philadelphia Stoneware Face JugExceedingly Rare & Important Remmey, Philadelphia Stoneware Face JugExceedingly Rare & Important Remmey, Philadelphia Stoneware Face JugExceedingly Rare & Important Remmey, Philadelphia Stoneware Face JugExceedingly Rare & Important Remmey, Philadelphia Stoneware Face Jug

American Folk Art Icon. Exceedingly Rare and Important Cobalt-Decorated Stoneware Face Harvest Jug, attributed to Henry Harrison Remmey or Richard Clinton Remmey, Philadelphia, PA, circa 1855-1865. One of a small number of Remmey family face vessels known, this double-face harvest jug is among the most coveted forms in all of American stoneware. Very few of its kind have to come to auction in the past thirty years, this restored jug being among the most brilliantly-colored of any example known. Provenance: A recently-surfaced example. H 7".

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Extremely Rare H. & G. NASH / UTICA Stoneware Jar w/ Man-Smoking-Pipe Decoration

Extremely Rare Two-Gallon Stoneware Jar with Cobalt Profile of a Man Smoking a Pipe, Stamped "H. & G. NASH / UTICA," Henry and George Nash, Utica, NY, circa 1832-1837. This whimsical design includes the figure's goatee holding the pipe in place.

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Exceedingly Rare and Important Exceedingly Rare and Important Exceedingly Rare and Important Exceedingly Rare and Important Exceedingly Rare and Important

Earliest Known Southern Stoneware Maker's Mark. Exceedingly Rare and Important One-Gallon Stoneware Jar with Iron-Oxide and Cobalt Slip Decoration, Stamped "BALTIMORE / UNION STONEWARE / MANUFACTORY," Michael Grub and John Kilmer, Baltimore, MD, circa 1808-1810. Decorated in the "iron-dipped" English style, Baltimore Union pieces were made contemporaneously with related Alexandria, Virginia stoneware produced by Lewis Plum, the master under which John Swann apprenticed. The stamp on this jar predates any maker's marks found on Alexandria or Richmond, VA stoneware, pieces produced by the Webster family in Fayetteville, NC, examples of Samuel Smith, Jr. stoneware from Knoxville, TN, or pieces produced at Abner Landrum's Pottersville Pottery in the Edgefield District of SC, making it the earliest Southern stoneware maker's mark known. This example reveals the beginnings of cobalt slip decoration in Southern-made stoneware with the brushed highlight over the capacity mark. One of five or so pieces bearing this stamp known. Literature: Illustrated and discussed in Kille, "Distinguishing Marks and Flowering Designs: Baltimore's Utilitarian Stoneware Industry," Ceramics in American 2005, fig. 17.

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Very Rare M. TYLER & CO. / ALBANY 3 Gal. Incised Stoneware Water Cooler, Albany, NY, c1825Very Rare M. TYLER & CO. / ALBANY 3 Gal. Incised Stoneware Water Cooler, Albany, NY, c1825

Outstanding Large-Sized Stoneware Water Cooler with Incised Floral Decoration, Stamped "M. TYLER & CO. / ALBANY," NY State origin, circa 1825. Exceptional form featuring a high-styled floral motif and stripe-decorated bunghole. The distinctive incising on this cooler indicates it was likely decorated by George Lent or an associate. H 16".

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Extremely Fine and Rare Early Manhattan Stoneware Jar w/ Incised DecorationExtremely Fine and Rare Early Manhattan Stoneware Jar w/ Incised Decoration

Extremely Fine and Rare Two-Gallon Vertical-Handled Stoneware Jar with Incised Floral Decoration, Manhattan, NY origin, probably Crolius Family, circa 1790.

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Important Important Important Important Important

Parr Political Piece. Probably Unique Glazed Redware Political Jug with Incised Bird Decoration, Inscribed "look this way for henry clay," attributed to David Parr, Jr., Baltimore, MD, circa 1844. This jug surfaced years ago at a Baltimore, MD, flea market and recent analysis suggests that local potter, David Parr, Jr., was its likely creator. The incised bird with speech bubble and profuse stippled incising bears remarkable stylistic similarities to the famous "Geo. N. Fulton" stoneware water cooler with incised eagle made at Parr's later Richmond manufactory in 1856. Parr's Whig party membership further corroborates this attribution. Parr was an avid Whig, an assistant marshal at the 1844 Whig National Convention in Baltimore, which nominated Clay for president, and a committee member of Baltimore's Central Clay Club, which supported Henry Clay's candidacy for president. Provenance: Previously purchased years ago at a Baltimore area flea market. H 10 1/2".

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Extremely Rare attrib. J. H. Miller / Brandenburg, KY Stoneware Pan w/ Large Bird DecorationExtremely Rare attrib. J. H. Miller / Brandenburg, KY Stoneware Pan w/ Large Bird DecorationExtremely Rare attrib. J. H. Miller / Brandenburg, KY Stoneware Pan w/ Large Bird Decoration

Southern Bird. Extremely Rare Stoneware Bowl with Cobalt Bird-and-Floral Decoration, attributed to James H. Miller, Brandenburg, KY, circa 1860. Rare in its form and extruded strap handles, this work is one of a few examples of bird-decorated stoneware known from James Miller's tenure in Kentucky. H 7" ; Diam. 8 3/4".

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Exceptional Greensboro, PA 12 Gal. Stoneware Jar with Applied Rose DesignExceptional Greensboro, PA 12 Gal. Stoneware Jar with Applied Rose DesignExceptional Greensboro, PA 12 Gal. Stoneware Jar with Applied Rose DesignExceptional Greensboro, PA 12 Gal. Stoneware Jar with Applied Rose Design

Exceptional Twelve-Gallon Stoneware Jar with Applied Rose Motif and Elaborate Cobalt Floral Decoration, attributed to James Hamilton, Greensboro, PA, circa 1865. H 21 1/4".

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Outstanding Edwin Bennett, Baltimore, MD Cold-Painted Marine PitcherOutstanding Edwin Bennett, Baltimore, MD Cold-Painted Marine PitcherOutstanding Edwin Bennett, Baltimore, MD Cold-Painted Marine PitcherOutstanding Edwin Bennett, Baltimore, MD Cold-Painted Marine Pitcher

Rockingham Masterwork. Possibly Unique Molded Rockingham Marine Pitcher with Original Painted Surface, attributed to Edwin and William Bennett, Baltimore, MD, mid 19th century. This Bennett form, produced by Charles Coxon from molded Chesapeake Bay sea life, is among the most iconic designs in the field of American Rockinghamware. Typically found with local-blue-clayed or Rockingham-glazed bodies, this example instead features a Rockingham-glazed interior and elaborate polychrome paint-decorated exterior. It is the only painted marine pitcher known, possibly an early or specially-ordered work designed to mimic majolicaware. H 10 3/8".

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Fine Anna Pottery John Gaubatz / St. Louis Stoneware Pig FlaskFine Anna Pottery John Gaubatz / St. Louis Stoneware Pig FlaskFine Anna Pottery John Gaubatz / St. Louis Stoneware Pig FlaskFine Anna Pottery John Gaubatz / St. Louis Stoneware Pig FlaskFine Anna Pottery John Gaubatz / St. Louis Stoneware Pig FlaskFine Anna Pottery John Gaubatz / St. Louis Stoneware Pig FlaskFine Anna Pottery John Gaubatz / St. Louis Stoneware Pig FlaskFine Anna Pottery John Gaubatz / St. Louis Stoneware Pig FlaskFine Anna Pottery John Gaubatz / St. Louis Stoneware Pig FlaskFine Anna Pottery John Gaubatz / St. Louis Stoneware Pig FlaskFine Anna Pottery John Gaubatz / St. Louis Stoneware Pig FlaskFine Anna Pottery John Gaubatz / St. Louis Stoneware Pig Flask

Fine Anna Pottery Stoneware Pig Flask with St. Louis, MO Advertising, Wallace and Cornwall Kirkpatrick, Anna, IL, circa 1875. Provenance: A fresh-to-the-market example, which descended in the family of the consignor. L 8".

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Extremely Rare Four-Gallon Baltimore Stoneware PitcherExtremely Rare Four-Gallon Baltimore Stoneware PitcherExtremely Rare Four-Gallon Baltimore Stoneware PitcherExtremely Rare Four-Gallon Baltimore Stoneware Pitcher

Exceptional Size. Exceedingly Rare Four-Gallon Stoneware Pitcher with Cobalt Clover Decoration, Baltimore, MD origin, circa 1870. The only four-gallon Baltimore clover-decorated pitcher that we have seen, likely specially-ordered for use in a large place of business or farm. H 15 3/4".

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Extremely Rare and Important Lanier Meaders Conjoined Pair of Face JugsExtremely Rare and Important Lanier Meaders Conjoined Pair of Face JugsExtremely Rare and Important Lanier Meaders Conjoined Pair of Face JugsExtremely Rare and Important Lanier Meaders Conjoined Pair of Face JugsExtremely Rare and Important Lanier Meaders Conjoined Pair of Face JugsExtremely Rare and Important Lanier Meaders Conjoined Pair of Face JugsExtremely Rare and Important Lanier Meaders Conjoined Pair of Face Jugs

Identical Twins. Extremely Rare and Important Pair of Conjoined Stoneware Face Jugs, Each Signed "Lanier Meaders," Cleveland, GA, circa 1972. This outstanding folk sculpture consists of two alkaline-glazed face jugs fused together by a kiln brick that fell during the firing. Included with this lot is a custom wooden stand and a pair of melted cones from Meaders' kiln. H 8 3/4" ; L 14".

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Exceptional and Important HARRINGTON & BURGER / ROCHESTER, NY Stoneware Bird Scene Churn

Rare Bird. Exceptional and Important Six-Gallon Stoneware Churn with Cobalt Pheasant-on-Flower Motif, Stamped "HARRINGTON & BURGER/ ROCHESTER, NY," circa 1852-1854. This work reveals Burger's ability at depicting flora and fauna in a highly-detailed, life-like manner, which surpassed that of all other American stoneware decorators. The pheasant motif is exceedingly rare in Burger's production with only a few pieces decorated with this design known. While the value of this work is obvious in its extravagant slip-trailed design and maker, the rarity of the motif increases the vessel's importance. While other known Burger pheasant motifs depict the bird perched on a branch, this example features it resting atop a flower, a folky inaccuracy in the sizing of the design elements also seen in the work of the Norton family of Bennington, Vermont. Burger produced this piece during the short-lived partnership he maintained with one of New York State's other leading potters, Thompson Harrington. The decoration is unquestionably in Burger's hand. Burger's drawings in cobalt slip are noteworthy in the time it took to produce each one and, as noted, in their high artistic quality, considering his work was made for utilitarian purposes and he had no academic training. Many in his day would be impressed to see a pencil drawing of the level of his work. The fact that he was able to create his images in unforgiving, flowing slip on a rounded vessel (that then need to be fired properly) is remarkable. The verticality and incredible size of the design, measuring 15 1/2" tall, nicely complements the piece's large and desirable churn form. Easily the most important example of Rochester stoneware to come to auction in recent years. Provenance: A fresh-to-the-market example, from a recently-surfaced Brooklyn, NY collection. H 21".

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Outstanding JOHN BURGER / ROCHESTER, NY Stoneware Crock w/ Slip-Trailed Cornucopia Decoration

Burger Beauty. Outstanding and Rare Five-Gallon Stoneware Jar with Cobalt Cornucopia Decoration, Stamped "JOHN BURGER / ROCHESTER," NY State origin, circa 1860. Provenance: A fresh-to-the-market example, from a recently-surfaced Brooklyn, NY collection. H 13".

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Outstanding and Important Election of 1868 Stoneware Crock w/ Horatio Seymour

American History in Clay. Outstanding and Important Six-Gallon Stoneware Crock with Cobalt Figural Decoration and Political Inscription, OH origin, 1868. This political cartoon crock references the U.S. Presidential Election of 1868, in which Democratic candidate, New York Governor, Horatio Seymour (1810-1886), was defeated by the Republican candidate, Ulysses Grant (1822-1885), Commanding General of the Union Army during the Civil War. Seymour, a popular figure in the Democratic Party had served as the chairman of the Democratic National Convention in 1864 and 1868. After numerous indecisive ballots at the event in 1868, the convention nominated Seymour, a man who was not seeking the presidency, but reluctantly accepted. The Election of 1868 was the first U.S. Presidential Election after the abolition of slavery. Grant won in an electoral college landslide of 214 votes to Seymour's 80. He received strong support in his native state of Ohio, where this piece was made, winning by over 41,000 votes. His victory was in part achieved by 500,000 votes from blacks. Seymour received the majority of white votes. The 1868 presidential election, stands as one of the most historically significant in 19th century America. Reconstruction was in full throttle with our country capturing its breath and coming out of the darkness of a Civil War that had literally torn it apart. The Radical Republicans wanted to make the South pay for their treason, and one of the main agendas of the North was to add Reconstruction amendments to our Constitution giving African Americans freedom, civil rights, and the power of the vote. The year of this crock and the meaning of its message was a highly significant civil rights moment in our nation's history. The term "going up Salt River" is a slogan dating as early as 1827, that came to symbolize political defeat. It was popularized as a political term in 1839 by Ohio Representative, Alexander Duncan (1788-1853), when he used it in a House of Representatives speech. The Salt River is a 150 mile-long river that runs through Kentucky and empties into the Ohio River, the main waterway of the region. To "go up Salt River," then, is to take an unconventional and treacherous route that leaves you lost or dead. Seymour is humorously depicted in the crock's decoration as wading into a river. "Frank" refers to Missouri Senator, Frank Blair (1821-1875) who ran as Seymour's running mate and was a white supremacist. This crock, featuring historical significance related to American civil rights and an exceptionally-large 11" height to the rendering of Seymour, is regarded as a masterwork of Ohio stoneware and among the finest examples of regional stoneware to come to auction in years. H 14".

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Exceptional 1820 Ohio River Valley Stoneware Pitcher w Brushed Cobalt and Manganese Federal Eagle DesignExceptional 1820 Ohio River Valley Stoneware Pitcher w Brushed Cobalt and Manganese Federal Eagle DesignExceptional 1820 Ohio River Valley Stoneware Pitcher w Brushed Cobalt and Manganese Federal Eagle DesignExceptional 1820 Ohio River Valley Stoneware Pitcher w Brushed Cobalt and Manganese Federal Eagle DesignExceptional 1820 Ohio River Valley Stoneware Pitcher w Brushed Cobalt and Manganese Federal Eagle Design

Early Eagle. Exceptional One-Gallon Stoneware Pitcher with Cobalt and Iron Federal Eagle Decoration, Dated "1820," Ohio River Valley origin, 1820. This pitcher was produced early in the introduction of cobalt-decorated stoneware to the rapidly-developing Ohio River Valley. Related works include an outstanding large-sized cooler with incised Federal eagle motif, also highlighted in blue and brown slips. Combining a large two-color-slip figural design, extremely early date, and stylish form, this pitcher is among the most important stoneware pieces from the region to come to auction in years. Few pieces of this age and origin exhibit decorative quality of this level, the heavy-handed brushwork and juxtaposition of colors creating a wonderful folk art representation of our national symbol.

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Fine EDMANDS & CO. (Boston, MA) Stoneware Jar w/ Elaborate Slip-Trailed Deer DecorationFine EDMANDS & CO. (Boston, MA) Stoneware Jar w/ Elaborate Slip-Trailed Deer Decoration

Fine Two-Gallon Stoneware Jar with Cobalt Reclining Deer Scene, Stamped "EDMANDS & CO," Charlestown, MA, circa 1860. Provenance: A fresh-to-the-market example, from a recently-surfaced Brooklyn, NY collection.

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Rare Small-Sized Bray Brothers Stoneware Temperance Jug, Illinois, Kentucky or Indiana, c1880-90Rare Small-Sized Bray Brothers Stoneware Temperance Jug, Illinois, Kentucky or Indiana, c1880-90Rare Small-Sized Bray Brothers Stoneware Temperance Jug, Illinois, Kentucky or Indiana, c1880-90Rare Small-Sized Bray Brothers Stoneware Temperance Jug, Illinois, Kentucky or Indiana, c1880-90Rare Small-Sized Bray Brothers Stoneware Temperance Jug, Illinois, Kentucky or Indiana, c1880-90Rare Small-Sized Bray Brothers Stoneware Temperance Jug, Illinois, Kentucky or Indiana, c1880-90Rare Small-Sized Bray Brothers Stoneware Temperance Jug, Illinois, Kentucky or Indiana, c1880-90

In the Anna Style. Very Rare Small-Sized Stoneware Temperance Jug, attributed to Simeon L., J. Wallace, or William Bray, IN, IL, or KY origin, circa 1880-1890. The Bray brothers, Simeon, J. Wallace, and William, were all potters who were raised in Anna, Illinois. Their father, James Bray, was a mason born in Ireland and previously living in Massachusetts. According to the U.S. Federal census, James Bray and his family were living in Anna, Illinois by 1860. The itinerance of the three potter-brothers is evidenced in census and city directories of the period. Simeon Bray, the oldest of the three, is listed in the 1870 U.S. Federal Census as a "turner in pottery" working in Anna, Illinois, where he presumably adopted the temperance jug form in his production at Wallace and Cornwall Kirkpatricks' Anna Pottery. The same year, he is also listed as working in Pulaski County, Illinois, presumably at the Mound City Pottery. Simeon and William Bray are listed in the 1880 census as potters working in both Evansville, Indiana and Mound City, Illinois, again likely at the Mound City Pottery. J. Wallace Bray is listed in the 1880 census as a "clay artist" working in Metropolis, Illinois, assumedly at Metropolis Pottery, and in an 1890 city directory as a potter working in Paducah, Kentucky. In all, less than ten Bray family temperance jugs have been documented, making them significantly rarer than the Kirkpatrick examples on which they are based. The goose seen on this jug is a previously-undocumented figure for this form. A related jug featuring the same molded man was sold as lot 115 in Crocker Farm's July 18, 2015 auction. Provenance: A recently-discovered example. H 7 3/4".

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Important Anna Pottery Thomas Nast Pig BottleImportant Anna Pottery Thomas Nast Pig BottleImportant Anna Pottery Thomas Nast Pig BottleImportant Anna Pottery Thomas Nast Pig BottleImportant Anna Pottery Thomas Nast Pig BottleImportant Anna Pottery Thomas Nast Pig BottleImportant Anna Pottery Thomas Nast Pig BottleImportant Anna Pottery Thomas Nast Pig BottleImportant Anna Pottery Thomas Nast Pig Bottle

The Thomas Nast Pig Flask. Important and Possibly Unique Anna Pottery Stoneware Pig Flask with Dedication to Political Cartoonist, Thomas Nast, Signed "By Anna Pottery / 1884," Wallace and Cornwall Kirkpatrick, Anna, IL, 1884 One side of pig is incised with the inscription, "Latest and Only Reliable / Railroad and River Guide / Respectfully Dedicated to th Nast in / By Anna Pottery." Additionally incised below within a rectangular border, "Bizmark(sic) Pork-," with the dash pointing to the rear of the pig. The top of this pig features the inscription, "Nast turning summersalts(sic)," with incised image of a man with donkey's head in the act of somersaulting. The remainder of the pig includes an incised railroad map of the Midwestern United States, including the following landmarks: St. Louis the future Great in-, Miss River, Springfield, Bloomington, Jonesboro, Cairo, Anna, Carbondale, Duquoin, Tamaroa, Centralia, Odin, Mattoon, Champaign, Kankakee, Pullman, Vincennes, W st S. & P, Tunnel Hill, Mound City, Dubuque, Cincinnati the Pork City, and Chicago the Great Corn City. The pig includes incised slashes to tops of ears and extremely rare incised stubble on the pig's snout.

The inscriptions on this pig testify to the Kirkpatrick brothers' intense interest in the renowned Harper's Weekly political cartoonist, Thomas Nast (1840-1902). A number of the Kirkpatricks' finer pieces are political commentaries, often inspired by or referencing this artist's work. On some pieces, the artist himself is even caricatured. Nast, born in Landau, Germany and moving to New York City at age six, is regarded as the "Father of the American Cartoon" and his work is associated with a number of iconic American images. He is credited with creating the modern depiction of Santa Claus and the elephant as the symbol of the Republican Party, as well as popularizing the image of Uncle Sam, the female personification of America known as Columbia, and the donkey as a symbol of the Democratic Party. He worked for Harper's Weekly from 1859 to 1860 and 1862 to 1886, producing 2,250 cartoons over his career. The Kirkpatricks' appreciation for Nast is evidenced by a remarkable stoneware snake jug gifted to the cartoonist in 1871, depicting the heads of members of the Boss Tweed ring on the snakes' bodies. Nast had helped expose the corruption of Tweed's Tammany Hall in his cartoons. The underside of the jug is incised with the presentation inscription, "From, / Kirkpatrick, / Anna Ills / Th. Nast NY." This outstanding work was later gifted by Nast's widow to the New York Historical Society, where it currently resides. The abbreviated name inscription, "Th. Nast," as seen on the bottom of the snake jug and on this pig, is the manner in which Nast signed his autograph, further evidence of the Kirkpatrick's fascination with this artist. While it can be assumed that this pig, like the Boss Tweed snake jug, was gifted to Nast, according to family history, it never left Illinois.

The inscription on the back of the pig, "Nast turning summersalts," may indicate that the Kirkpatricks had soured on the man thirteen years after they completed their Boss Tweed snake jug in his honor. The incised slogan likely refers to Nast's decision to support a Democratic Presidential candidate in the Election of 1884, the year this pig was made. Nast, like the Kirkpatricks, had always voted Republican and the Republican candidate had always won. His long career as America's leading political cartoonist had earned him a great deal of influence with the general public. Upon being elected in 1868, Grant declared that he had won "by the sword of Sheridan and pen of Thomas Nast." Several years earlier, while covering the Civil War, Nast had been described by President Lincoln as the Union's best recruiting sergeant and by General Grant as having done as much as any one man to preserve the Union. Therefore, in the Election of 1886, Nast's decision to support Democrat, Grover Cleveland, over Republican candidate, James G. Blaine, was a major political story unto itself. He held that much power in his artwork. Harper's Weekly was displeased with Nast's choice in Cleveland, who ultimately won the presidency, and he was fired in 1886. The Kirkpatricks, as staunch Republicans, were assumedly also upset by Nast's support of Cleveland. The inscription, "Nast turning summersaults," likely refers to Nast's change of political heart, with the cartoonist depicted as a backflipping figure with Democratic donkey's head. This anthropomorphized donkey was likely taken from Nast's cartoons, as he at times caricaturized the Democratic Party as a suited man with donkey's head. As much of the Kirkpatricks' political commentary was meant to be playful, the extent to which the potter-brothers were truly displeased with Nast is unclear here.
The inscription at the base of the pig, "Bismarck Pork," is another allusion to Nast's life, referring to German chancellor, Otto von Bismarck (1815-1898), the leader of Nast's home country and an occasional subject of the artist's drawings. This pig is the only example of this iconic Kirkpatrick form that we have seen with a specific dedication to the famed cartoonist that influenced so much of the brothers' work. Including an homage to Nast in the form of its own political cartoon along the pig's back, this outstanding work of American art pottery is among the most important Anna pig flasks known. Provenance: A newly-discovered work, which recently surfaced in the Pacific Northwest, having descended in an Illinois family. L 6 1/2".

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Very Rare Small-Sized Stoneware Temperance Jug, Boonville, Missouri originVery Rare Small-Sized Stoneware Temperance Jug, Boonville, Missouri originVery Rare Small-Sized Stoneware Temperance Jug, Boonville, Missouri originVery Rare Small-Sized Stoneware Temperance Jug, Boonville, Missouri originVery Rare Small-Sized Stoneware Temperance Jug, Boonville, Missouri originVery Rare Small-Sized Stoneware Temperance Jug, Boonville, Missouri originVery Rare Small-Sized Stoneware Temperance Jug, Boonville, Missouri originVery Rare Small-Sized Stoneware Temperance Jug, Boonville, Missouri origin

Very Rare Small-Sized Stoneware Temperance Jug, Stamped "MR. Wm-E. BUSAN / PRiVATE.," Boonville, MO origin, late 19th century. This jug's snake handle includes impressed triangular and diamond-shaped scaling, circular eyes, and a highly unusual protruding tongue. Front impressed with the arched stamped, "MR. Wm-E. BUSAN / PRiVATE," with the word, "PRIVATE," likely referring to the fact that the jug held Busan's private stock of liquor. Relatively few temperance jugs are known with an inscription to the owner. This example's use of a stamp for the inscription is extremely rare, perhaps significant of the importance of this work to the owner or maker. H 6".

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Exceptional Green-Glazed New England Redware Jug (Maine origin)Exceptional Green-Glazed New England Redware Jug (Maine origin)Exceptional Green-Glazed New England Redware Jug (Maine origin)Exceptional Green-Glazed New England Redware Jug (Maine origin)

Maine Masterwork. Exceptional Copper-and-Manganese-Glazed Redware Jug, ME origin, early 19th century. Among the finest-glazed examples of Maine redware that we have seen. H 11 1/4".

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Rare Redware Jug attrib. Capt. John Norton, Bennington, VT, late 18th / early 19th centuryRare Redware Jug attrib. Capt. John Norton, Bennington, VT, late 18th / early 19th centuryRare Redware Jug attrib. Capt. John Norton, Bennington, VT, late 18th / early 19th century

Norton Pottery at its Earliest. Exceedingly Rare and Important Diminutive Slip-Decorated Redware Jug, attributed to Abel Wadsworth at the Captain John Norton Pottery, Bennington, VT, late 18th or early century. This jug is representative of the early beginnings of the Norton potting dynasty in which the family patriarch and Revolutionary War veteran, Captain John Norton, produced redware on his farm in Bennington, Vermont, after moving there in 1785. A well-documented "rosetta stone" jug by the same hand carries a detailed family provenance indicating it was made by potter, Abel Wadsworth, while working at the Captain John Norton pottery, for a young girl named Omindia (Armstrong) Gerry. Redware pieces from this period in Norton family pottery production are considered extremely rare and attributions to this site are limited. The jug in this auction is considered highly important as a smaller sibling to the "Gerry jug," one of the most iconic examples of Vermont redware known. H 5 1/4".

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Phenomenal JOHN BELL (Waynesboro, PA) Redware Vase w/ Vibrant Green Copper Glaze

Bell Art Pottery. Phenomenal Redware Vase with Vibrant Copper Glaze, Stamped "JOHN BELL," Waynesboro, PA, circa 1850-1880. Both modern in glaze treatment and form, this vase is likely Bell's response to America’s burgeoning Art Pottery Movement. The idea that this work was made by a country utilitarian potter and not an academically-trained artist is evidence of Bell's genius. H 8 7/8".

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Exceptional Large-Sized Pennsylvania Redware Hand-Modeled Goat FigureExceptional Large-Sized Pennsylvania Redware Hand-Modeled Goat FigureExceptional Large-Sized Pennsylvania Redware Hand-Modeled Goat FigureExceptional Large-Sized Pennsylvania Redware Hand-Modeled Goat FigureExceptional Large-Sized Pennsylvania Redware Hand-Modeled Goat FigureExceptional Large-Sized Pennsylvania Redware Hand-Modeled Goat FigureExceptional Large-Sized Pennsylvania Redware Hand-Modeled Goat FigureExceptional Large-Sized Pennsylvania Redware Hand-Modeled Goat FigureExceptional Large-Sized Pennsylvania Redware Hand-Modeled Goat Figure

Folk Art Figural. Exceedingly Rare and Important Large-Sized Redware Figure of a Goat, PA origin, circa 1850-1880. Among the rarest and most striking forms in the genre of Pennsylvania redware animal figures, this restored example is modeled in an appealing large size. The redware seated goat form gained notoriety when a highly important example signed by Winchester, VA master potter, Anthony Bacher, crossed the block at Sotheby's sale of "Important Americana: The Collection of Dr. and Mrs. Henry P. Deyerle" on May 26 and 27, 1995. The Pennsylvania example to be sold in this auction is one of the more noteworthy recent offerings in American ceramic folk sculpture. H 6 1/2" ; L 5 1/8".

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Outstanding Redware Flask w/ Incised Decorations incl. an African-American Figure, Fish and Bird: Outstanding Redware Flask w/ Incised Decorations incl. an African-American Figure, Fish and Bird: Outstanding Redware Flask w/ Incised Decorations incl. an African-American Figure, Fish and Bird: Outstanding Redware Flask w/ Incised Decorations incl. an African-American Figure, Fish and Bird: Outstanding Redware Flask w/ Incised Decorations incl. an African-American Figure, Fish and Bird: Outstanding Redware Flask w/ Incised Decorations incl. an African-American Figure, Fish and Bird: Outstanding Redware Flask w/ Incised Decorations incl. an African-American Figure, Fish and Bird:

Incredible Incising. Outstanding Glazed Redware Flask with Incised Decoration of an African-American Man's Bust, Fish, Bird, and Flower, Incised "Flow's Flask / sip / me," American, circa 1790-1840. Exceptional subject matter. H 5 5/8".

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Exceptional HARRISBURG, PA Stoneware Jar w/ Elaborate Slip-Trailed Bird Design, attrib. John Young, 1856-58

Decoration, Maker, and Size. Exceptional One-Gallon Stoneware Jug with Elaborate Bird-and-Floral Decoration, Stamped "HARRISBURG PA.," John Young, Harrisburg, PA, circa 1856-1858. Excellent use of both slip-trailed and brushed elements to the design, a characteristic of Young's work, indicative of his New York training, but rarely seen in the output of other Harrisburg potters. The composition of this jar's design is unusual in its depiction of both a bird and flowering plant on the same piece. Provenance: Ex- Chris Machmer. H 10".

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Fine 4 Gal. COWDEN & WILCOX / HARRISBURG, PA Stoneware Cake Crock w/ Large Bird-in-Wreath Decoration

Rare and Fine Four-Gallon Stoneware Cake Crock with Cobalt Bird-in-Wreath Decoration, Stamped "COWDEN & WILCOX / HARRISBURG, PA," circa 1865.

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Extremely Rare attrib. F.H. Cowden / Harrisburg, PA Stoneware SpanielExtremely Rare attrib. F.H. Cowden / Harrisburg, PA Stoneware SpanielExtremely Rare attrib. F.H. Cowden / Harrisburg, PA Stoneware SpanielExtremely Rare attrib. F.H. Cowden / Harrisburg, PA Stoneware SpanielExtremely Rare attrib. F.H. Cowden / Harrisburg, PA Stoneware SpanielExtremely Rare attrib. F.H. Cowden / Harrisburg, PA Stoneware SpanielExtremely Rare attrib. F.H. Cowden / Harrisburg, PA Stoneware Spaniel

Central Pennsylvania Dog. Extremely Rare Cobalt-Decorated Stoneware Spaniel, Inscribed "W. T G," William T. Good at the F.H. Cowden Pottery, Harrisburg, PA, circa 1880. Good's spaniels produced at the Cowden pottery are considered rare, and, when found, this form is typically found with an Albany slip glaze and impressed initials. The salt-over-cobalt glaze treatment on this spaniel is not only more attractive, but also significantly rarer. Literature: For a related Albany-slip-glazed spaniel and cobalt-decorated miniature spittoon, both bearing Good's initials, see Matthew R . Miller, Decorated Stoneware of Cowden, p. 154. H 7 3/4".

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Very Rare WILLSON S & YOUNG / HARRISBURG, PA Stoneware Jar

Very Rare One-Gallon Stoneware Jar with Cobalt Tulip Decoration, Stamped "WILLSON'S & YOUNG. / HARRISBURG, PA,” circa 1855. Provenance: Purchased by the consignor at Roan Auction's Sale of the Eleanor C. Stipp Collection in the 1980s. Stipp reportedly had family connections to the Harrisburg stoneware industry. Red labels on the jar's reverse and underside indicate the piece's maker and Stipp provenance.

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Important JOHN BELL / WAYNESBORO Stoneware Jar Made for Annie Bell by Husband Victor Conrad BellImportant JOHN BELL / WAYNESBORO Stoneware Jar Made for Annie Bell by Husband Victor Conrad BellImportant JOHN BELL / WAYNESBORO Stoneware Jar Made for Annie Bell by Husband Victor Conrad BellImportant JOHN BELL / WAYNESBORO Stoneware Jar Made for Annie Bell by Husband Victor Conrad BellImportant JOHN BELL / WAYNESBORO Stoneware Jar Made for Annie Bell by Husband Victor Conrad BellImportant JOHN BELL / WAYNESBORO Stoneware Jar Made for Annie Bell by Husband Victor Conrad BellImportant JOHN BELL / WAYNESBORO Stoneware Jar Made for Annie Bell by Husband Victor Conrad BellImportant JOHN BELL / WAYNESBORO Stoneware Jar Made for Annie Bell by Husband Victor Conrad BellImportant JOHN BELL / WAYNESBORO Stoneware Jar Made for Annie Bell by Husband Victor Conrad BellImportant JOHN BELL / WAYNESBORO Stoneware Jar Made for Annie Bell by Husband Victor Conrad Bell

Bell Presentation Jar. Exceedingly Rare and Important Four-Gallon Lidded Stoneware Jar with Cobalt Floral Decoration and 1874 Date, Inscribed "A" and "VCB," Stamped "JOHN BELL / WAYNESBORO'," Victor Conrad Bell and possibly Solomon Bell, Waynesboro, PA, 1874. This jar was made by Victor Conrad Bell (1845-1925) for his wife, Annie E. Bell (1844-1918), in 1874. It is closely-related to a two-gallon jar bearing the cobalt inscriptions, "A" and "V.C. Bell" on the side, as well as the incised inscription, "Made by Solomon Bell for Annie Bell January 1, 1874," on the underside. A second related jar bears the very similar decoration to the body and shoulder, a brushed 1874 date, and the inscription, "Made by Solomon Bell for Tillie Bell January 1, 1874." Matilda Catherine "Tillie" Bell (1838-1901) was one of John Bell's daughters. Her presentation jar, like the Annie Bell jars, includes a "T," for Tillie. A third related jar bears no inscription, but was presumably also made for Tillie. It includes two brushed 1874 dates and the initial "T" a the shoulder. It is likely that all four jars were made on January 1, 1874, or within a day or two of each other, when the Strasburg, Virginia potter, Solomon Bell, was visiting the family of his brother, John, in Waynesboro, Pennsylvania. Evidently, this visit led to a series of family pots being made. As noted by John Kille in his Ceramics in America 2005 article, "Bell Family Presentation Jar," and discussed in Rice and Stoudt's The Shenandoah Pottery, Victor Conrad Bell severed an artery in his wrist as a child, making it difficult for him to throw pottery. As a result, he served as a decorator at the family shop. As two of the related 1874 jars bear Solomon Bell signatures (one even including both Solomon and Victor Conrad's signature), it is highly likely that this jar was thrown by Solomon and decorated by Victor Conrad as a gift to the latter's wife. This jar is a highly-important example of Bell family pottery, bearing the stamp of the father and signature of the son, with a possible third hand, a well-known uncle, involved in its production. Decoratively-speaking, the jar is an excellent work, featuring unusual added vining at the shoulder, a desirable splayed tulip variant, additional decoration under each handle, and even a date. Perhaps more importantly, the wonderful family history involved in this work, connecting father and son as well as husband and wife, add emotion and meaning to an already-beautiful object. H (excluding lid) 12 1/2"; Diam. (of lid) 10 1/2".

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Extremely Rare Small-Sized John Bell Stoneware Pitcher w/ Celadon Glaze, Incised Extremely Rare Small-Sized John Bell Stoneware Pitcher w/ Celadon Glaze, Incised Extremely Rare Small-Sized John Bell Stoneware Pitcher w/ Celadon Glaze, Incised Extremely Rare Small-Sized John Bell Stoneware Pitcher w/ Celadon Glaze, Incised Extremely Rare Small-Sized John Bell Stoneware Pitcher w/ Celadon Glaze, Incised Extremely Rare Small-Sized John Bell Stoneware Pitcher w/ Celadon Glaze, Incised

Stauffer and Shenk. Fine and Extremely Rare Small-Sized Stoneware Pitcher with Celadon Glaze, Stamped "JOHN BELL," Incised on Underside "S + S," Stauffer and Shank at the John Bell Pottery, Waynesboro, PA, circa 1865-1875. The incised “S + S” on the underside refers to the itinerant potting duo of Stauffer and Shenk, who, according to Comstock's The Pottery of the Shenandoah Valley Region, were employed at the John Bell Pottery circa 1865 to 1870. A small number of examples of marked John Bell pottery bearing their incised initials or various name inscriptions on the underside are known. H 5 3/4".

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Very Fine Miniature JOHN BELL, Waynesboro, PA Redware Pitcher and Bowl SetVery Fine Miniature JOHN BELL, Waynesboro, PA Redware Pitcher and Bowl SetVery Fine Miniature JOHN BELL, Waynesboro, PA Redware Pitcher and Bowl SetVery Fine Miniature JOHN BELL, Waynesboro, PA Redware Pitcher and Bowl SetVery Fine Miniature JOHN BELL, Waynesboro, PA Redware Pitcher and Bowl SetVery Fine Miniature JOHN BELL, Waynesboro, PA Redware Pitcher and Bowl Set

Rare and Fine Miniature Glazed Redware Pitcher and Bowl Set, Pitcher Stamped "JOHN BELL," Waynesboro, PA, circa 1840-1880. H (of pitcher) 5" ; H (of bowl) 2" : Diam. (of bowl) 5 3/4".

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Rare JOHN BELL / WAYNESBORO, PA Redware CruetRare JOHN BELL / WAYNESBORO, PA Redware CruetRare JOHN BELL / WAYNESBORO, PA Redware CruetRare JOHN BELL / WAYNESBORO, PA Redware CruetRare JOHN BELL / WAYNESBORO, PA Redware Cruet

Very Rare Glazed Redware Cruet, Stamped Twice "JOHN BELL / WAYNESBORO'," PA origin, circa 1850-1880. One of a small number of examples of this stylish Bell form known and only the second that we have ever offered. H 8".

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Very Rare Very Rare Very Rare Very Rare Very Rare Very Rare Very Rare

Repurposed Dave Vessel. Very Rare Three-Gallon Alkaline-Glazed Stoneware Jug Repurposed as a Jar, Incised "Dave / June 27. 1861," Dave at Lewis Miles' Stony Bluff Manufactory, Horse Creek Valley, Edgefield District, SC, 1861. The spout of this rare survivor was broken during use and the top was rounded out so the vessel could be repurposed as a jar. It is one of less than ten documented Dave works from the year 1861. Only five such vessels are documented in Golberg and Witkowski's Ceramics in America 2006 article, "Beneath His Magic Touch: The Dated Vessels of the African-American Slave Potter Dave." This jug is also one of less than ten documented Dave vessels bearing his signature but lacking the initials of his owner, Lewis Miles. Only five pieces inscribed in this manner are documented in Goldberg and Witkowski. Lastly, Dave's signature, involving a large flourish, is an unusual treatment, offering insight into the pride this artisan likely took in his work despite his enslavement. This piece's survival and rebirth as a jar further emphasizes the importance of such objects, even in their day, as necessary for daily Southern life. H 14 1/4".

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Large Chandler / Maker (Thomas Chandler, Edgefield District, SC) Stoneware JarLarge Chandler / Maker (Thomas Chandler, Edgefield District, SC) Stoneware Jar

Six-Gallon Alkaline-Glazed Stoneware Jar with Iron Slip Decoration, Stamped "CHANDLER / MAKer," Thomas Chandler, Edgefield District, SC, circa 1850. Provenance: A fresh-to-the-market example, which recently surfaced in New York State. H 16 1/2".

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Exceedingly Rare and Important Incised Southern Stoneware Jug, Virginia or TennesseeExceedingly Rare and Important Incised Southern Stoneware Jug, Virginia or TennesseeExceedingly Rare and Important Incised Southern Stoneware Jug, Virginia or TennesseeExceedingly Rare and Important Incised Southern Stoneware Jug, Virginia or TennesseeExceedingly Rare and Important Incised Southern Stoneware Jug, Virginia or Tennessee

In the Manhattan Style. Rare and Important Southern Stoneware Jug with Incised Floral Decoration, VA or TN origin, possibly John Floyd at the Graves Pottery, Knox County, TN, circa 1857. The distinctive "open-work" incising featuring tear-drop-shaped petals relate this work to a highly-important cooler made by itinerant potter, John Floyd, at the Graves Pottery in Knox County, Tennessee. The cooler bears the inscription, "Made by Jn Floyd Knox Couty(sic) Tenn June 30 1857." Both the cooler and this jug are decorated in the style of Manhattan's Lower East Side potters, but feature darker clay typical of most Southern-made stoneware. The style of incising also compellingly connects this jug to the Rockbridge County, Virginia potter, John Morgan, a probable relative, of Corlears Hook, NY potter, David Morgan. The impressed capacity mark and style of handle on this jug further indicate it was not made in Manhattan. This stamp appears closely-related to a number of capacity marks found on stoneware produced in Virginia's James River Valley. As relatively few examples of incised stoneware made in the American South are known, this jug serves as an important work both decoratively and historically speaking. Provenance: A fresh-to-the-market example, from a recently-surfaced Brooklyn, NY collection. H 17".

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Fine J.H. McCONNELL / ALLIANCE, O. / Oct 22 1895 Presentation Stoneware Harvest JugFine J.H. McCONNELL / ALLIANCE, O. / Oct 22 1895 Presentation Stoneware Harvest JugFine J.H. McCONNELL / ALLIANCE, O. / Oct 22 1895 Presentation Stoneware Harvest Jug

Fine Presentation Stoneware Harvest Jug, Inscribed "J,H, McCONNELL. / ALLIANCE. O. / Oct 22 1895," Ohio origin, 1895. H 10 1/2".

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Extremely Rare Ohio Stoneware Harvest Jug with Open Handles, Extremely Rare Ohio Stoneware Harvest Jug with Open Handles, Extremely Rare Ohio Stoneware Harvest Jug with Open Handles, Extremely Rare Ohio Stoneware Harvest Jug with Open Handles, Extremely Rare Ohio Stoneware Harvest Jug with Open Handles,

Exceptional Form. Extremely Rare Triple-Handled Stoneware Harvest Jug with Cobalt Decoration and Inscription, Midwestern origin, probably Columbiana County, OH, circa 1880. Front of jug inscribed with the slip-trailed name, "Petter Yerian." According to 1850-1880 U.S. Federal Censuses, Peter Yerian, born circa 1828, was a farmer born living in Columbiana County, Ohio. This harvest jug is the first American example that we have seen made with three handles. H 10 1/4".

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Rare Uniontown, Pennsylvania Stoneware People CrockRare Uniontown, Pennsylvania Stoneware People Crock

Rare Five-Gallon Cobalt-Decorated Stoneware People Crock, Uniontown, PA origin, circa 1865. Provenance: Purchased decades ago from dealer, Peter Chillingworth.

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Very Rare T. J. S. (Thomas J. Suttle, Perryopolis, PA) Stoneware Jar with Bold Floral DecorationVery Rare T. J. S. (Thomas J. Suttle, Perryopolis, PA) Stoneware Jar with Bold Floral DecorationVery Rare T. J. S. (Thomas J. Suttle, Perryopolis, PA) Stoneware Jar with Bold Floral Decoration

Very Rare Three-Gallon Stoneware Jar with Elaborate Cobalt Floral Decoration, Stenciled "T J S," Thomas J. Suttle, Perryopolis, PA, circa 1865.

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Fine Greensboro, PA Stoneware Canning Jar with Stenciled Pears Decoration

Fine Cobalt-Decorated Stoneware Canning Jar with Stenciled Pears Decoration, Greensboro, PA origin, circa 1875. H 8 1/4".

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Rare Atchison (New Geneva, PA) Stoneware Jar w/ Vertical Snake-Style DesignRare Atchison (New Geneva, PA) Stoneware Jar w/ Vertical Snake-Style DesignRare Atchison (New Geneva, PA) Stoneware Jar w/ Vertical Snake-Style Design

Fine Stoneware Canning Jar with Cobalt "Snake" Decoration, attributed to Henry K. Atchison, New Geneva, PA, circa 1860. H 8 1/2".

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Unusual Western PA Stoneware Canning Jar with Crosshatched Design and Metal LidUnusual Western PA Stoneware Canning Jar with Crosshatched Design and Metal LidUnusual Western PA Stoneware Canning Jar with Crosshatched Design and Metal LidUnusual Western PA Stoneware Canning Jar with Crosshatched Design and Metal Lid

Very Rare Stoneware Canning Jar with Crosshatched Cobalt Stripe Decoration, Western PA origin, circa 1875. H 8".

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Extremely Rare Miniature R.C. REMMEY & SON / PHILADELPHIA, PA Stoneware PitcherExtremely Rare Miniature R.C. REMMEY & SON / PHILADELPHIA, PA Stoneware PitcherExtremely Rare Miniature R.C. REMMEY & SON / PHILADELPHIA, PA Stoneware Pitcher

Remmey Miniature. Extremely Rare and Important Miniature Stoneware Pitcher with Cobalt Decoration, Stamped "MANUFACTURED / BY / R.C. REMMEY & SON / PHILADA, / PA.," circa 1895. This example is the only one of its kind that we have seen and also the only Remmey piece bearing this specific mark that we are aware of. Bricks and at least one stoneware spigot bearing different "R.C. REMMEY & SON" stamps have survived. Among the last signed stoneware pitchers produced by this storied American potting dynasty, which was founded in New York City in the early decades of the 18th century. H 3 1/4".

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Extremely Rare Remmey / Philadelphia Small-Sized Stoneware Tankard PitcherExtremely Rare Remmey / Philadelphia Small-Sized Stoneware Tankard PitcherExtremely Rare Remmey / Philadelphia Small-Sized Stoneware Tankard Pitcher

Extremely Rare Small-Sized Stoneware Tankard Pitcher with Cobalt Floral Decoration, attributed to Henry Harrison Remmey or Richard Clinton Remmey, Philadelphia, PA, circa 1865. H 4 3/4".

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Exceedingly Rare and Important Four-Gallon Stoneware Jar with Cobalt Sailing Ship and Flag Motifs, Baltimore, MD origin, circa 1840Exceedingly Rare and Important Four-Gallon Stoneware Jar with Cobalt Sailing Ship and Flag Motifs, Baltimore, MD origin, circa 1840Exceedingly Rare and Important Four-Gallon Stoneware Jar with Cobalt Sailing Ship and Flag Motifs, Baltimore, MD origin, circa 1840Exceedingly Rare and Important Four-Gallon Stoneware Jar with Cobalt Sailing Ship and Flag Motifs, Baltimore, MD origin, circa 1840Exceedingly Rare and Important Four-Gallon Stoneware Jar with Cobalt Sailing Ship and Flag Motifs, Baltimore, MD origin, circa 1840Exceedingly Rare and Important Four-Gallon Stoneware Jar with Cobalt Sailing Ship and Flag Motifs, Baltimore, MD origin, circa 1840

Baltimore Boat. Exceedingly Rare and Important Four-Gallon Stoneware Jar with Cobalt Sailing Ship and Flag Motifs, Baltimore, MD origin, circa 1840.

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Extremely Rare Slip-Decorated Redware Pig Bottle, Stamped Extremely Rare Slip-Decorated Redware Pig Bottle, Stamped Extremely Rare Slip-Decorated Redware Pig Bottle, Stamped Extremely Rare Slip-Decorated Redware Pig Bottle, Stamped Extremely Rare Slip-Decorated Redware Pig Bottle, Stamped Extremely Rare Slip-Decorated Redware Pig Bottle, Stamped Extremely Rare Slip-Decorated Redware Pig Bottle, Stamped Extremely Rare Slip-Decorated Redware Pig Bottle, Stamped Extremely Rare Slip-Decorated Redware Pig Bottle, Stamped Extremely Rare Slip-Decorated Redware Pig Bottle, Stamped Extremely Rare Slip-Decorated Redware Pig Bottle, Stamped

An Important Pennsylvania Redware Discovery. Extremely Rare Large-Sized Slip-Decorated Redware Pig Bottle, Stamped "D.P. SHENFELDER / READING, PA," circa 1870.

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Exceptional M & T Miller (Newport, PA) Stoneware Bird Jar

Exceptional Four-Gallon Stoneware Jar with Large Cobalt Bird-in-Wreath Decoration, Stamped "M. & T. MILLER / NEWPORT, PA.," circa 1870

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Rare J. Hart / Ogdensburgh, NY Stoneware Churn w/ Anchor Decoration

Very Rare Six-Gallon Stoneware Churn with Cobalt Anchor Decoration, Stamped "J.J. HART, / OGDENSBURG.," NY State origin, circa 1869-1874.

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Rare Rare Rare Rare Rare

Very Rare One-Gallon Stoneware Jar with Cobalt Floral Decoration, Stamped "EARNEST & COWLES," Baltimore, MD, circa 1830. This is the first example we have offered of the very rare stoneware produced at the stoneware manufactory of merchants George Earnest and Wesley Cowles.

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