SOUTHERN POTTERY Auction Highlights

The antique utilitarian pottery of the Southern United States is as varied as the states themselves, but Southern stoneware is often associated with the green / brown alkaline glazes that coat much of the work of these potters. Even so, finely-made redware vessels often bearing elaborate designs or colorful glazes and salt-glazed stoneware were also produced throughout the South. (For Virginia pottery, see our Virginia Stoneware and Shenandoah Valley Pottery auction highlights.)

Some Related Videos:

Stoneware Pottery Face Harvest Jug, Edgefield, South Carolina, mid 19th century

Mark discusses an exceptional Southern stoneware face vessel made in Edgefield District, South Carolina, circa 1845-55. Accompanied by an important related period photograph, it is part of our July 22, 2017 auction of American stoneware & redware pottery.

Edgefield, SC Face Jug w/ Important Provenance, 19th century

Mark displays an Edgefield, South Carolina, face jug--one of many rare face vessels included in our July 22, 2017 stoneware & redware pottery auction. This particular example features a fantastic provenance / history, part of the important John Gordon Collection of Folk Americana.

Monumental Brown Pottery, Arden, North Carolina, Face Jug, circa 1941

Mark discusses an important Southern stoneware face vessel: a devil jug inscribed "GRAHAMS FURNITURE / AND / HARDWARE STORE / BAKERSVLLE. (sic) NC" and impressed with the maker's mark, "Brown Pottery / Arden, N C / Hand-Made" (for Davis P. Brown). This exceptional example is part of our July 22, 2017 auction of American stoneware & redware pottery.

Edgefield, South Carolina, Stoneware Face Cup, mid 19th century

Mark discusses an unusual variant of an already-rare American ceramics form: an Edgefield, SC face cup. The highly regarded face vessels of Edgefield and the American South in general are usually more typical jug forms. This cup is one of a few examples of the form known in 19th century Edgefield pottery production, and will be included in our July 22, 2017 auction of American stoneware & redware pottery.

Edgefield, South Carolina, Pottery Face Jug, 19th century

Mark displays a fine example of a beloved American pottery form: the Southern stoneware face jug. Made in Edgefield, South Carolina, it is one of many face vessels featured in our July 22, 2017 auction of American stoneware & redware pottery.

Salem, North Carolina, Earthenware Fish Bottle (Moravian Pottery)

Mark displays a very fine example of redware made by the Moravian potters in Salem, NC, about the first quarter of the 19th century, and part of our July 22, 2017 auction of American stoneware & redware pottery.

North Carolina Redware Bowl, Moravian Pottery, 18th or early 19th century

Mark displays a slip-decorated earthenware bowl made in Bethabara or Salem, NC about the late 18th or early 19th century. This exceptional example of Southern ceramics will be sold as part of our July 22, 2017 auction of American stoneware & redware pottery.

Rare and Important Edgefield, South Carolina, Face Jug

Mark displays a particularly-fine example of an already-rare American stoneware form: the Edgefield face vessel. With an unusually-pronounced nose and particularly well-executed design, this is a fantastic example of American folk art, made around the middle of the 19th century. It will be sold as part of our March 25, 2017 auction of American stoneware & redware pottery.

Very Rare Moravian (Salem, NC) Redware Ring Bottle, circa 1800

Mark displays a very fine recently-discovered example of earthenware made by the beloved Moravian potters of North Carolina--a ring flask with a wonderful British-style glaze, part of our upcoming March 25, 2017 auction of antique American stoneware & redware pottery.

Rare Miles Mill (Edgefield, SC) Stoneware Face Jugs

Mark discusses two rare examples of antique American pottery--faces jugs made in Edgefield District, South Carolina, circa 1875. These excellent examples of American Southern folk art will be sold as part of our March 25, 2017 auction of American stoneware & redware pottery.

DAVE, Enslaved African-American Potter of South Carolina, 1862 Jar

Mark discusses an important new discovery in American ceramics, a stoneware jar dated January 13, 1862 and signed by the renowned potter, Dave. An enslaved man working for Lewis Miles in Edgefield District, South Carolina, Dave is celebrated for his wonderful works in clay and his ability to transcend his enslavement and consign his art to posterity. This very important example will be sold as part of our July 16, 2016 auction of American stoneware and redware pottery.

Antique Winston-Salem, North Carolina, Earthenware Turtle Flask

Mark displays a great, very rare example of Moravian redware made in NC circa 1800-1850, a multi-glazed turtle flask. It will be sold as part of our July 16, 2016 auction of American stoneware & redware pottery.

Important Antique Tennessee Stoneware Pitcher, made by Decker for Remmey

Luke discusses an important discovery in the field of period American ceramics: a small-sized stoneware presentation pitcher made by famous potter Charles F. Decker in Chucky Valley, TN for his friend and former co-worker in Philadelphia, Henry Harrison "Harry" Remmey--member of the exceedingly important family of American stoneware potters, the Remmeys. It will be sold as part of our July 16, 2016 auction of American stoneware & redware pottery.

Edgefield, South Carolina, Stoneware Pottery Face Jug, circa 1860-80

Mark discusses a rare and important example of Southern pottery: a small-sized Edgefield, South Carolina, stoneware face jug with a very rare protruding tongue. It will be sold as part of our March 19, 2016 auction of American stoneware and redware.

Early 20th Century Atlanta, Georgia, Stoneware Pottery Face Jug

Mark displays an outstanding stoneware face jug made in Atlanta, Georgia, by the Brown Family in early 20th century. Inscribed "Gon But Not forgotten" and covered in an Albany glaze, this great example will be sold as part of our March 19, 2016 auction of American stoneware and redware pottery.

Alamance County, North Carolina, Redware Jar, circa 1790-1810

Mark discusses a striking example of early North Carolina redware, attributed to Jacob Albright, Jr. and Henry Loy, Alamance County, circa 1790-1810. This profusely-decorated jar will be sold as part of our March 19, 2016 auction of American stoneware & redware pottery.

Edgefield, South Carolina, Pottery Face Jug, circa 1860

Mark discusses an important recent Southern pottery discovery: an Edgefield, SC face jug made circa 1860. Recent research suggests this type of jug was produced by African Americans, and this form is regarded as something of a pinnacle of American ceramic folk art. It will be sold as part of our July 18, 2015 landmark auction of antique American stoneware & redware pottery.

Collin Rhodes, Edgefield, South Carolina Pottery Jug, circa 1845

Mark displays an important example of antique Southern Pottery: a double-handled jug with two-color slip attributed to Collin Rhodes, Shaw's Creek, Edgefield, SC. It is part of our upcoming important July 18, 2015 auction of American stoneware & redware.

CHANDLER MAKER Edgefield, SC Stoneware Pottery Jug, circa 1850

Mark talks about an exceptional double-handled jug made at Thomas Chandler's manufactory in Edgefield, South Carolina. It will be sold as part of our March 14, 2015 auction of American stoneware & redware pottery.

NC Moravian Pottery: Fish Flask and Pair of Squirrel Bottles

Mark discusses some excellent examples of Moravian Pottery made in Salem, North Carolina, circa 1804-29. They will be sold as part of our October 25, 2014 Auction of American Stoneware & Redware Pottery.

Alamance County, North Carolina, Redware Pottery Mug, circa 1800

Mark talks about a wonderful, recently-discovered example of Alamance County, NC redware made in the late 18th or early 19th century. It will be sold as part of our October 25, 2014 Auction of American Stoneware & Redware Pottery.

Antique Rock Mills, Alabama, Stoneware Pottery Face Vessel

Mark talks about an important stoneware figure attributable to the Rock Mills, Alabama, School of face vessels. Like a few other very rare Rock Mills pieces, this fantastic large-sized piece depicts an African-American "Preacher Man," and was made toward the end of the nineteenth century. It is being offered as part of our July 19, 2014 Auction of Antique American Stoneware & Redware Pottery.

Antique Great Road Pottery of Tennessee and Virginia

Mark talks about a variety of Great Road pottery (redware / earthenware) we are selling as part of our March 1, 2014 auction of American stoneware & redware pottery.

Dave "the Slave" Drake (Edgefield, SC) 1857 Signed Stoneware Jar

Mark discusses a signed and dated stoneware jar by renowned enslaved African-American potter David Drake, often referred to as "Dave the Slave." This fresh-to-the-market, previously undocumented example will be sold as part of our March 2, 2013 stoneware auction.

Antique Maysville, Kentucky Stoneware Churn, Isaac Thomas 1837

Luke talks about an important example of Kentucky stoneware that we will be selling on March 2, 2013 as part of our first stoneware & redware auction of the year: an eight-gallon I. THOMAS church, dated twice 1837 and inscribed "Kentucky." For more info on Kentucky stoneware, see Luke's video on the Evan G. Ricketts pitcher we sold on November 3, 2012 for $19,550.

Great Road Pottery Earthenware Jar (Tennessee / Virginia)

Mark discusses a very fine example of pottery by the Great Road potters of eastern Tennessee and southwest Virginia. This remarkable piece of Southern pottery will be sold as part of our November 3, 2012 stoneware & redware auction.

Earliest Dated Example of Kentucky Stoneware, 1833

Luke discusses a recently-discovered, very important example of Kentucky stoneware, made by Evan G. Ricketts in Maysville, dated July 3, 1833. This pitcher will be sold as part of our Fall 2012 antique American stoneware and redware auction, to be held November 3, 2012.

Henry Watkins (North Carolina Pottery) 1852 Redware Jar

Brandt briefly discusses Henry Watkins and the signed and dated 1852 jar we will be selling on March 3, 2012--a very interesting example of Southern pottery.

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