ANTIQUE AMERICAN REDWARE Auction Highlights

Pair of Shenandoah Valley Redware Whippet Dogs, Signed

$115,000

Pair of Shenandoah Valley Redware Whippet Dogs, Signed "Samuel Bell / Winchester Sept 21 1841"

WORLD AUCTION RECORDS: VIRGINIA POTTERY (By Lot), SHENANDOAH VALLEY POTTERY (By Lot)

07/20/2013

Matched Pair of Redware Spaniels, Stamped

$42,550

Matched Pair of Redware Spaniels, Stamped "JOHN BELL," Waynesboro, PA

WORLD AUCTION RECORD: JOHN BELL REDWARE (By Lot)

07/20/2013

JOHN W. BELL / Waynesboro, Pa Redware Whippet Figure

$41,800

JOHN W. BELL / Waynesboro, Pa Redware Whippet Figure

WORLD AUCTION RECORD, BELL FAMILY REDWARE

05/21/2005

A large percentage of American stoneware potters also produced redware (basically a modern collecting term for common American earthenware), but there were far more redware potters in the United States than there were stoneware ones. The skill and overall investment in making stoneware--and difficulty of procuring satisfactory stoneware clay--made it tough to start a stoneware enterprise, and it was often the case that American redware potters were not even primarily potters. Instead, they were farmers or other tradespeople looking to supplement their income while filling a need for their community. Stoneware needs appropriate clay to be able to reach the high temperature that turns the clay into, essentially, stone, and one advantage of stoneware over earthenware was that the stone body prevented liquid from leaching through the surface. Conversely, earthenware is a low-fired pottery that is porous even after firing, and required a lead glaze on at least the interior to prevent seepage. These lead glazes were understood to be toxic early in American history, and this was one reason for the growth of the American stoneware industry as the nineteenth century commenced. While the maker or area of origin contributes to the value of American redware, the most valuable pieces tend to be those with colorful or elaborate glazes / designs, and those of unusual forms--and you will notice this as you browse our previous auction highlights above.

Some Related Videos:

Samuel Troxel, Montgomery County, PA Sgraffito Redware Plate, 1833

Luke discusses a very important example of Pennsylvania redware: an elaborate sgraffito-decorated plate, inscribed on reverse, "Samuel Troxel / Potter To uperhanover / Township Montgomery / County January us the / 25th A.D. 1833." It will be sold as part of our July 22, 2017 auction of American stoneware & redware pottery.

John Nice, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania, Redware Sugar Bowl, circa 1830

Mark displays a very fine example of Pennsylvania redware, made by Montgomery County potter, John Nice--a sugar bowl with elaborate applied designs and slip decoration. It will be sold as a part of our July 22, 2017 auction of American stoneware & redware pottery.

Heavily-Decorated 1810 Bucks County Redware Jar

Luke displays a phenomenal example of Pennsylvania redware. Dated 1810 and absolutely covered in a wonderful flowering plant design, it will be sold as part of our July 16, 2016 auction of American stoneware & redware pottery.

Antique Pennsylvania Redware Animal Figures

Luke discusses three exceptional examples of antique Pennsylvania redware, two dogs and a very rare lion standing atop a bird. These fantastic figures will be sold as part of our March 19, 2016 auction of American stoneware & redware pottery.

Andrew Uhler Antique Pennsylvania Redware Plate

Luke displays a very rare example of southeastern PA redware: an elaborate sgraffito plate made by Andrew Uhler and bearing is extremely rare maker's mark on reverse: A.D. It will be sold as part of our landmark July 18, 2015 auction of American stoneware & redware pottery.

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