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AUCTION INFO

Next Auction

Oct. 25, 2014: Stoneware & Redware Pottery.
(More Info)

Location: Our historic gallery.

15900 York Rd, Sparks, MD 21152. (Directions.)

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CROCKER FARM TV JOHN BELL / WAYNESBORO, Pennsylvania Redware Trivet
Antique Crock, American Stoneware
Antique American Redware Pot
Remmey Stoneware Pottery Pitcher, Philadelphia
Attrib. Morgantown Redware Jar
John Brelsford, Philadelphia, Stoneware Gemel (Double Jug)
Baltimore Stoneware Pottery Cooler, probably Perine
B.C. MILBURN / ALEXA Alexandria, VA Stoneware Water Cooler
Antique Stoneware Bank
H. MYERS Stoneware Water Cooler (Henry Remmey, Baltimore)

Monumental Samuel Bell (Winchester, VA) Stoneware Horses Jar, c1840

Mark discusses the finest example of Virginia stoneware to be offered at auction in decades: an eight-gallon crock made by beloved potter Samuel Bell in Winchester, Virginia, circa 1840. Adorned with four horses around the vessel, this is one of the most iconic examples of American stoneware in existence. It will be sold as part of our October 25, 2014 Auction of American Stoneware & Redware Pottery.

J & E Norton, Bennington, Vermont Stoneware Water Cooler

Luke talks about a fantastic example of Norton (Bennington, VT) stoneware--a stoneware cooler with in-the-round decoration of an elaborate house, a deer, and a bird on stump. The work of the Nortons is beloved as some of the finest stoneware made in the United States. This cooler will be sold as part of our October 25, 2014 Auction of American Stoneware & Redware Pottery.

Cowden & Wilcox (Harrisburg, PA) Civil War Soldier Stoneware Jug

Brandt talks about one of the greatest examples of Cowden & Wilcox stoneware in existence, and the best piece of Pennsylvania stoneware to come to auction in years: a jug bearing the design of a Civil War era soldier wearing a shako hat. It will be sold as part of our October 25, 2014 Auction of American Stoneware & Redware Pottery.

NC Moravian Pottery: Fish Flask and Pair of Squirrel Bottles

Mark discusses some excellent examples of Moravian Pottery made in Salem, North Carolina, circa 1804-29. They will be sold as part of our October 25, 2014 Auction of American Stoneware & Redware Pottery.

Anna Pottery Centennial Snake Jug

Mark discusses a very important Anna Pottery snake jug, dated January 1, 1876. The work of the Brothers Kirkpatrick at their "Anna Pottery" in Anna, Illinois, is celebrated as some of the greatest American stoneware ever created. This remarkable example will be sold as part of our October 25, 2014 Auction of American Stoneware & Redware Pottery.

Anna Pottery Railroad Conductor Pitcher, 1884

Luke talks about an important example of Anna Pottery--a pitcher modeled in the form of a railroad conductor, inscribed "Here's to Paps Heath" and signed and dated 1884. "Paps Heath" probably refers to Marvin Heath, a well-known conductor during the time period. While the inscription was inscrutable for decades, through his research Luke was able to uncover this new information. This pitcher will be sold as part of our October 25, 2014 Auction of American Stoneware & Redware Pottery.

Anna Pottery Snake Whiskey Flask / Jug, 1884

Brandt discusses a historically significant example of Anna Pottery (made by the Kirkpatrick Brothers in Anna, Illinois). Signed and dated 1884, the flask is adorned with one of the brothers' life-like snakes and inscribed "Harper's $500 Little Brown Jug 1883"--a reference to Illinois's 1883 Harper High License Bill of 1883, which fixed the price of a whiskey license at $500. It will be sold as part of our October 25, 2014 Auction of American Stoneware & Redware Pottery.

Alamance County, North Carolina, Redware Pottery Mug, circa 1800

Mark talks about a wonderful, recently-discovered example of Alamance County, NC redware made in the late 18th or early 19th century. It will be sold as part of our October 25, 2014 Auction of American Stoneware & Redware Pottery.

Warne & Letts (South Amboy, New Jersey) Stoneware Teapot, c1807

Mark discusses a very rare example of early NJ stoneware--a teapot or other pouring vessel attributable to Warne & Letts (South Amboy) based in part on the distinctive impressed bird design. It will be sold as part of our October 25, 2014 Auction of American Stoneware & Redware Pottery.

Very Important Norton, Bennington, VT, Lion & Deer Scene Stoneware Cooler

Mark discusses one of the greatest examples of American stoneware we have ever offered: An elaborately-decorated water cooler bearing a lion and deer scene, stamped J. & E. NORTON / BENNINGTON, VT. The work of the Nortons is highly prized, and the stoneware they produced is generally considered to be the gold standard of its type. The very elaborate scene on this example, which incorporates an incredibly rare lion design, makes it difficult to overstate the important of this example of the Norton's work. This water cooler is part of our July 19, 2014 Auction of Antique American Stoneware & Redware Pottery.

Shenandoah Pottery Whippet Dog, Solomon Bell (Winchester, VA)

Mark discusses an important redware whippet dog figure made in the Shenandoah Valley of Virginia by renowned potter Solomon Bell. A beloved form by collectors of American redware, this particular whippet is signed in script by Bell and inscribed "Winchester," its place of manufacture; it was made circa 1840. This exceptional piece of Shenandoah Pottery is part of our July 19, 2014 Auction of Antique American Stoneware & Redware Pottery.

Antique 1844 Putnam County, Indiana, Stoneware Pitcher

Luke discusses a very important, recently-identified example of Indiana stoneware. Incised in the manner of earlier northeastern U.S. stoneware, this pitcher bears an elaborate bird and floral design and is signed and dated 1844. It will be sold as part of our July 19, 2014 Auction of American Stoneware & Redware Pottery.

Antique Rock Mills, Alabama, Stoneware Pottery Face Vessel

Mark talks about an important stoneware figure attributable to the Rock Mills, Alabama, School of face vessels. Like a few other very rare Rock Mills pieces, this fantastic large-sized piece depicts an African-American "Preacher Man," and was made toward the end of the nineteenth century. It is being offered as part of our July 19, 2014 Auction of Antique American Stoneware & Redware Pottery.

Antique Virginia Stoneware Pottery Face Jug

Mark talks about an important American stoneware discovery. Treasured as one of the pinnacles of the American stoneware craft, face jugs and other face vessels have only very rarely ever been attributable to the Commonwealth of Virginia. This recently-surfaced example is attributed to Virginia--possibly Strasburg, VA in the Shenandoah Valley--based on distinctive clay quality and form. It will be sold as part of our July 19, 2014 Auction of Antique American Stoneware & Redware Pottery.

Anna Pottery Salt-Glazed Stoneware Snake Jug

Mark discusses an important newly-discovered example of Anna Pottery. Made by the famous Kirkpatrick Brothers of Anna, Illinois, this salt-glazed stoneware snake jug features both blue (cobalt) and brown (manganese) highlights and is inscribed "little Brown Jug / by Anna Pottery / Jan 22 1885." It will be sold as part of our July 19, 2014 Auction of Antique American Stoneware & Redware Pottery.

1828 Cornwall, NY Stoneware Presentation Water Cooler by M.C. Bell

Luke talks about an important, recently-discovered example of Cornwall, New York, stoneware: a water cooler made by Moses Clarke Bell probably for Niles Frost, a brewery owner operating near Cornwall. This is one of the most important examples of Cornwall stoneware to surface in some time, and will be sold as part of our July 19, 2014 Auction of American Stoneware & Redware Pottery.

1853 Sherburne, NY Stoneware Diana the Huntress Flask

Luke talks about an important American stoneware flask dated 1853 and signed by Delos Rogers, potter working in Sherburne, New York, at the manufactory of stoneware producer James Hart. This flask bears the sprig-molded design of Diana the Huntress with a stag. The refers bears the misspelled inscription "DELOS ROCERS / 1853." This important example will be offered as part of our July 19, 2014 Auction of American Stoneware & Redware Pottery.

Antique Maysville, Kentucky, Stoneware Pitcher (N. Cooper & Power)

Luke discusses an important example of Kentucky stoneware--a pitcher bearing the mark, "N. COOPER & POWER / MAYSVILLE, KY." The mark refers to the Maysville merchant firm of Newton Cooper and his brother-in-law, Hugh Power. Other rare pieces bearing cobalt inscriptions of Cooper & Power or Newton Cooper's name alone exist, and these are all of southwestern Pennsylvania origin. This pitcher is the only example we have seen signed in this manner and while it was also possibly made in southwestern PA, in may in fact have been made in Maysville. This important piece will be sold as part of our July 19, 2014 Auction of American Stoneware & Redware Pottery.

Antique Great Road Pottery of Tennessee and Virginia

Mark talks about a variety of Great Road pottery (redware / earthenware) we are selling as part of our March 1, 2014 auction of American stoneware & redware pottery.

Very Important New York City Stoneware Pottery Lion Pitcher (18th / Early 19th Century)

Mark discusses a very important new discovery in American stoneware, an early Manhattan stoneware pitcher bearing the incised design of a lion. This is only the second example of New York City stoneware we have seen bearing this sort of design, the other being an iconic jar in the collection of Yale University. The lion may be a patriotic British sentiment fashioned prior to the American Revolution, or a later (circa late 18th century) creation inspired by popular animal shows of the time period. This is one of the finest examples of the work of the cherished New York City potters to surface in quite some time, and it is part of our upcoming March 1, 2014 auction of American stoneware & redware pottery.

Important New York City Stoneware John Bull Jug

Luke talks about an important new discovery in early Manhattan stoneware: a jug apparently depicting "John Bull" (basically the British equivalent of Uncle Sam). Rendered as a reclining anthropomorphic bull smoking a pipe, the jug is probably a commentary on the British consumption of an American crop. It will be sold as part of our March 1, 2014 auction of American stoneware & redware pottery.

Antique (Late 18th / Early 19th Century) New York City Stoneware Ring Flask

Mark discusses a fantastic example of early Manhattan stoneware that is part of our March 1, 2014 auction of American stoneware & redware pottery: a heavily-incised stoneware ring flask, a very rare form, probably made by the famous Crolius family of New York City potters.

Richard C. Remmey (Philadelphia, PA) Stoneware Presentation Pitcher

Luke discusses a very rare small-sized cream pitcher attributed to the famous Philadelphia stoneware potter of the late 19th century, Richard Clinton Remmey. A very unusual form (fashioned in the style of fine English ceramics), this pitcher was made for Katherine Salzer, born in Philadelphia in 1874, the daugher of a local carpenter. This new discovery will be sold as part of our March 1 auction of American stoneware & redware pottery.

Selection of Antique Baltimore Stoneware

Luke discusses a fine selection of Baltimore stoneware that will be included as part of our March 1, 2014 stoneware & redware pottery auction. Luke is currently authoring a book on the subject of Baltimore stoneware.

Group of Antique Southwestern Pennsylvania Stoneware Pitchers

Luke talks about several pitchers of southwestern PA origin that are part of our March 1, 2014 stoneware & redware pottery auction. Pitchers from this beloved region of American stoneware are rare, and this group is a remarkable assemblage, amongst other important western PA examples we will be selling on March 1.

Extremely Rare R.W. RUSSELL / BEAVER, PA Small-Sized Stoneware Water Cooler

Mark discusses an important new discovery in southwestern Pennsylvania stoneware: an very unusually-sized water cooler with profuse cobalt decoration, made by Ralph W. Russell in Beaver, PA in the mid 19th century. It will be sold as part of our March 1, 2014 stoneware & redware auction.

Very Rare Anna Pottery Horace Greeley Pig Bottle

Mark talks about one of three known Anna Pottery "Horace Greeley" pig flasks, which is included as part of our March 1, 2014 auction of American stoneware & redware pottery. The Kirkpatrick Brothers of Anna, Illinois, are perhaps most famous for their pig bottles. Quick to incorporate politics or social commentary into their work when it suited them, the Kirkpatricks took aim at important 19th century political figure and presidential candidate Horace Greeley on this exceptional example.

Important Anna Pottery Snake Jug w/ Civil War and Slavery Motifs

Mark discusses the finest example of Anna Pottery (of Anna, Illinois) we have ever handled, a temperance jug featuring Union soldiers, the face of a slave, and what may be President Abraham Lincoln being gobbled up by snakes. Very rare and highly valued by scholars and collectors even at their most basic, this version of the Kirkpatrick Brothers' elaborate, large snake jugs is one of the most rife with American historical content in existence. This important, museum quality example will be offered as part of our March 1, 2014 auction of American stoneware & redware.

Important Shenandoah Valley Redware Pottery Plate, attributed to Peter Bell

Mark discusses an important example of Shenandoah Valley pottery, which is actually documented / pictured in the landmark 1929 book, The Shenandoah Pottery, by Rice & Stoudt. Dated 1808, it is attributed to the patriarch of Shenandoah Valley pottery production, Peter Bell (father of the famous potters John Bell of Waynesboro, PA, and Solomon Bell and Samuel Bell of Winchester and Strasburg, VA), from his Hagerstown, MD years. This finely-decorated example with a wonderful provenance is part of our important November 2, 2013 Auction of American Stoneware & Redware Pottery.

Exceptional Group of Antique Stoneware Bird Crocks

Mark talks about some fantastic examples of stoneware crocks bearing decorations, which we will be selling (along with many other bird-decorated pieces) in our November 2, 2013 Auction of American Stoneware & Redware. This sale features over 600 lots of American utilitarian pottery.

Some Extremely Fine Examples of Antique Alexandria, Virginia, Stoneware

Mark talks about four significant pieces of Alexandria, VA stoneware that are part of our November 2, 2013 Auction of American Stoneware & Redware Pottery--including two very rare pitchers and what is perhaps the absolute best B.C. Milburn jar in existence. This is also perhaps the greatest grouping (quality-wise) of Alexandria stoneware ever offered in a single auction.

Early American Stoneware, Abraham Mead, Greenwich, CT Pottery, circa 1790

Brandt talks about Abraham Mead of Greenwich, Connecticut--a potter born in 1742--and the two examples of his work that we will be selling as part of our Fall 2013 Stoneware & Redware Pottery Auction, to be held November 2, 2013. Each of these was made circa 1790, and Brandt also displays a couple of early New Jersey or Manhattan examples as points of comparion.

Antique North Bay, New York, Stoneware

Brandt discusses the fairly rare pottery of John C. Waelde from North Bay, NY, made around the third quarter of the 19th century. This is probably the finest grouping of North Bay stoneware ever to be included in a single auction, and it will all be offered as part of our November 2, 2013 auction of American stoneware & redware pottery.

Pair of Samuel Bell / Winchester, Virginia, Redware Whippet Dogs, Signed and Dated 1841

Mark talks about what is probably the most significant discovery in Shenandoah Valley pottery of the past decade--a pair of Samuel Bell (Winchester, VA) redware whippets that descended in a prominent local family. Each dog is signed by Bell and dated September 21, 1841. This very important pair will be sold as part of our July 20, 2013 Auction of American Stoneware & Redware Pottery.

Early Manhattan / New York City Stoneware Ring Jug, Crolius / Remmey Families

Mark discusses an early Manhattan stoneware "ring jug," an exceptionally rare form in American stoneware, probably made for New York City ship captain Daniel Merritt in the early 19th century. This important example will be sold as part of July 20, 2013 landmark Auction of American Stoneware & Redware Pottery.

Very Important New York / 1802 Stoneware Eagle Jar

Mark discusses one of the finest examples of early Manhattan / New York City stoneware that we have ever handled: a small-sized jar bearing an elaborate incised federal eagle, with the inscription, "NEW YORK" and dated October 25, 1802. An apparent product of the venerated Remmey and Crolius families, this jar bears what we believe to be the earliest known depiction of a federal eagle on American stoneware. It will be sold as part of our landmark July 20, 2013 Auction of American Stoneware & Redware Pottery.

Hamilton & Jones (Greensboro, PA) Stoneware Eagle Crock, circa 1870

While stenciled eagles appear on many extant examples of southwestern PA stoneware, this is the only one of its kind we have seen--an elaborate incised and freehand decorated eagle on a six-gallon crock made by prolific potters Hamilton & Jones. It will be sold as part of our landmark July 20, 2013 Auction of American Stoneware & Redware Pottery, featuring over 600 lots.

Pair of John Bell (Waynesboro, Pennsylvania) Antique Redware Pottery Spaniels

Mark discusses a very fine pair of molded redware / earthenware spaniel dog figures made by prolific Waynesboro, Pennysylvania, potter John Bell. Other prolific Bell family members include John's father, Peter Bell (of Hagerstown, MD and Winchester, VA), and John's brothers, Solomon and Samuel Bell (of Winchester, VA and Strasburg, VA). This pair will be sold as part of our landmark July 20, 2013 Auction of American Stoneware & Redware Pottery.

Stoneware Jar Inscribed, From / Keesee & Parr / Richmond / Va

Luke talks about an important example of Richmond, Virginia, stoneware we will be selling as part of our July 20, 2013 Auction of American Stoneware & Redware Pottery: Made at the manufactory of well-known stoneware potter David Parr, Jr. and his partner Thomas W. Keesee, this jar is inscribed in cobalt, "From / Keesee & Parr / Richmond / Va"--the only example we have ever seen signed in this manner. (All other signed examples are stamped with a maker's mark.)

Very Important MORGAN MAKER (Wm. Morgan, Baltimore, c1822-27) Stoneware Cooler

Luke discusses one of the finest pieces of American stoneware we have ever handled: a profusely-decorated water cooler made by William Morgan in Baltimore circa 1822-1827, bearing an elaborate incised design of birds in a flowering tree. Possibly the greatest example of early Baltimore stoneware in existence, it will be sold as part of our landmark July 20, 2013 Auction of American Stoneware & Redware Pottery.

Anthony W. Bacher / 1872 Redware Harvest Jug (Thurmont, Maryland)

Mark discusses a very rare harvest jug made by well-known American redware potter, Anthony Weis Baecher / Bacher. Probably made during Bacher's time in Thurmont, Maryland (then called Mechanicstown), Bacher also worked in Winchester, Virginia, during the general time period. Most of Bacher's pieces signed in this manner are inscribed on the bottom, so this is a very rare example that sports his penmanship on its shoulder--the only one we have seen. It will be sold as part of our landmark July 20, 2013 Auction of American Stoneware & Redware.

Exceptional Pair of Antique Southwestern Pennsylvania Tanware Pottery Pitchers

Mark discusses a very fine pair of tanware pitchers made in New Geneva or Greensboro, PA around the fourth quarter of the 19th century. These will be sold as part of our landmark July 20, 2013 Auction of American Stoneware & Redware Pottery.

Group of Antique Anna Pottery, Kirkpatrick Brothers, Anna, Illinois

Mark discusses a very fine selection of Anna Pottery stoneware we will be selling as part of our March 2, 2013 stoneware & redware pottery auction.

Miniature Antique New York State Stoneware Incised Bird Churn

Mark talks about a very fine example of antique New York stoneware--a miniature churn with an incised bird and floral motif. It will be sold as part of our March 2, 2013 stoneware auction.

Antique Shenandoah Valley / Strasburg, Virginia Multi-Glazed Redware Pottery

Mark discusses the well-known and celebrated multi-colored redware (earthenware pottery) of Virginia's Shenandoah Valley--specifically produced by the Bell and Eberly families in Strasburg around the end of the 19th century. Referred to colloquially as "Multi-Glaze," these particular examples will be sold as part of our March 2, 2013 stoneware & redware auction.

John Burger (Rochester, NY) Antique Stoneware Water Cooler

Mark talks about a rare water cooler by esteemed Rochester, New York, stoneware potter John Burger, and discusses why Burger is considered one of the very best decorators American stoneware had to offer. This cooler will be sold as part of our March 2, 2013 stoneware and redware pottery auction.

Dave "the Slave" Drake (Edgefield, SC) 1857 Signed Stoneware Jar

Mark discusses a signed and dated stoneware jar by renowned enslaved African-American potter David Drake, often referred to as "Dave the Slave." This fresh-to-the-market, previously undocumented example will be sold as part of our March 2, 2013 stoneware auction.

Antique New Jersey Stoneware Jar / Crock with Stamped Woman Design

Mark talks about perhaps the finest example of this beloved group of New Jersey stoneware with impressed designs--an unusually small jar with a fine design of a woman's profile, which we have never seen before. It will be sold as part of our March 2, 2013 stoneware & redware pottery auction.

Solomon Bell (Strasburg, Virginia) Antique Redware Pottery Spaniel

Mark discusses one of the rarest examples of Solomon Bell's work to be sold in some time, a spaniel dog made in the vein of Staffordshire Cavalier King Charles spaniels. As an American redware form, these are more often associated with Solomon's brother, John Bell, who potted in Waynesboro, Pennsylvania. This exceptional example of Shenandoah Valley pottery, inscribed in Solomon's own hand and also stamped with a rare version of his maker's mark, will be sold as part of our important March 2, 2013 stoneware and redware pottery auction.

Clarkson Crolius, New York City, Stoneware Pottery Pitcher, circa 1810

Mark talks about one of the finest examples of revered potter Clarkson Crolius's work to be sold at auction in quite some time: a large-sized pitcher with incised foliate design. The most famous of the renowned Manhattan potters, Crolius's contemporaries included Thomas W. Commeraw and John Remmey III. This pitcher will be sold on March 2, 2013 as part of our first stoneware auction of the year.

Henry Watkins (North Carolina Pottery) 1852 Redware Jar

Brandt briefly discusses Henry Watkins and the signed and dated 1852 jar we will be selling on March 3, 2012--a very interesting example of Southern pottery.

Anthony W. Baecher Antique Redware Dog Figures

Mark discusses two redware pottery dog figures attributable to master potter Anthony Baecher (1824-1889)--a German immigrant potter who worked in Adams County, Pennsylvania, Winchester, Virginia, and Thurmont, Maryland. These dogs are attributed to Baecher (sometimes spelled Bacher) based on other examples. These dogs will be sold as part of our important March 2, 2013 stoneware & redware pottery auction. To view the remarkable dog and goat figures Mark references in the video, please visit http://museumcollection.winterthur.org/single-record.php?recid=1967.1886 and http://www.folkartmuseum.org/?p=folk&t=images&id=4049.

Antique Maysville, Kentucky Stoneware Churn, Isaac Thomas 1837

Luke talks about an important example of Kentucky stoneware that we will be selling on March 2, 2013 as part of our first stoneware & redware auction of the year: an eight-gallon I. THOMAS church, dated twice 1837 and inscribed "Kentucky." For more info on Kentucky stoneware, see Luke's video on the Evan G. Ricketts pitcher we sold on November 3, 2012 for $19,550.

Henry Remmey (Baltimore) Stoneware, 1812-1829

Luke discusses the work of Henry Remmey in Baltimore, using two examples of his work we will be selling on March 2, 2013 as part of our first antique American stoneware auction of the year. Luke's groundbreaking 2004 article on Remmey was the first to flesh out the Baltimore years of this prolific potter, as well as the long-sought origin of "H. MYERS" stoneware--discussed in this video. Luke's information on H. Remmey will be part of our important lecture to be held on March 1 in Sparks, Maryland ("Inferior to None: The Remmeys, First Family of American Stoneware").

Shenandoah Valley Pottery Stoneware Ring Flask, Mt. Crawford, Virginia

Mark talks about a very rare Shenandoah Valley pottery ring flask, attributed to James Shinnick (a prolific stoneware potter who worked in various locations), during his time in Mt. Crawford, Virginia. ( For more on Shinnick see http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oAHg1EQ28R0 ) This is only the second decorated Virginia stoneware ring flask we have ever seen, and the first of Shenandoah Valley origin. It will be sold on March 2, 2013 as part of our important first stoneware & redware pottery auction of the year.

Antique Swank Pottery (Johnstown, PA) Stoneware Presentation Bank

Brandt discusses an exceptional piece of southwestern Pennsylvania stoneware: a bank made at the Swank pottery in Johnstown, made for a local pastor. ( You can read more about Reverend L.M. Boyer at

Important Thomas Commeraw Stoneware Jar, circa 1800

Brandt talks about an interesting piece of Thomas Commeraw's work: a transitional example between his earlier freehand-incised pottery and his later work adorned with impressed crescents and other designs. For those unfamiliar with Commeraw, he was a free African American who potted on New York's Lower East Side from around 1796-1820. Brandt is completing a book on Commeraw's remarkable life and work, and you can read more about it at http://www.commeraw.com . This example will be sold on March 2, 2013 as part of our important early 2013 antique American stoneware & redware pottery auction.

Important Antique Stoneware Pitcher Excavated in Philadelphia

Luke talks about an American stoneware pitcher dug out of a Philadelphia privy that has helped revolutionize our understanding of stoneware production in the city. These stoneware pieces with coggled designs are always attributed to Old Bridge, New Jersey, but the discovery of this piece very near Branch Green s well-known (but fairly mysterious) stoneware pottery on Second Street basically affirms that some of the extant examples are actually of Philadelphia origin. It will be sold on March 2, 2013 as part of our first stoneware & redware pottery auction of the year.

Important Antique Ohio Stoneware Inkstand

Brandt discusses a remarkable, exceedingly rare (and complete) stoneware inkstand bearing the inscription OHIO and an 1829 date. Almost unheard-of in American stoneware, this is one of the more important pieces of antique utilitarian Ohio pottery to surface in some time. It will be sold as part of our first stoneware & redware pottery auction of 2013, to be held March 2.

Early Albany, New York, Stoneware (Paul Cushman and the Boynton Brothers)

Mark discusses three early Albany stoneware pieces we will be selling on March 2, 2013, as part of our first stoneware & redware auction of the year: an excellent small-sized keg or rundlet, probably made by Jonah or Calvin Boynton, as well as two Paul Cushman examples. Besides a squat-shaped jar bearing coggled designs, one features the highly desirable and rare HALF A MILE WEST OF ALBANY GOAL (sic for GAOL / jail]) mark.

Monumental Antique Stoneware Bank w/ Applied Grapes

Luke discusses a very large-sized American stoneware bank--the largest we have ever seen. Clearly of Ohio manufacture, this example will be sold as part of our important early 2013 auction of antique American stoneware & redware pottery, to be held March 2.

November 3, 2012 Stoneware & Redware Pottery Auction Gallery Walk

A quick "gallery walk" / tour of our gallery, the 1841 Gorsuch Barn in Sparks, Maryland, before our November 3, 2012 stoneware & redware pottery auction. The auction takes place at 10am (eastern time) on Saturday, November 3. A preview is held on Friday, November 2, from 1-6pm, and doors open at 8am on Saturday, before the sale. This auction features around 500 lots of antique American pottery.

Great Road Pottery Earthenware Jar (Tennessee / Virginia)

Mark discusses a very fine example of pottery by the Great Road potters of eastern Tennessee and southwest Virginia. This remarkable piece of Southern pottery will be sold as part of our November 3, 2012 stoneware & redware auction.

Circa 1750 New Jersey Stoneware Jar, Kemple Pottery, Ringoes, NJ

Mark discusses an important new discovery in American utilitarian ceramics: a very early colonial American stoneware jar made by the Kemple family in Ringoes, Hunterdon County, New Jersey. It will be sold as part of our November 3, 2012 stoneware auction.

Anna Pottery (Anna, Illinois) Abraham Lincoln "Death Mask"

Mark talks about a remarkable example of American pottery: a salt-glazed stoneware Abraham Lincoln head signed "Anna Pottery / 1877." Made by the Kirkpatrick Bros. in Anna, Illinois, these very rare pieces are referred to as Lincoln "Death Masks," but are more likely modeled after a living President Lincoln. This will be sold as part of our November 3, 2012 stoneware auction.

Antique Stoneware Folk Art Snake Jug, Anna Pottery (Illinois) or Texarkana Pottery (Arkansas)

Mark talks about an important American stoneware temperance jug. Snake jugs play off the concept of the evils of alcohol consumption, are considered tour-de-forces of American folk art. This one would usually be attributed to Anna Pottery (the Kirkpatrick Brothers of Anna, Illinois), but various aspects point to the related Texarkana Pottery of Texarkana, Arkansas. This will be offered as part of our November 3, 2012 stoneware auction.

Antique New York Stoneware St. Patrick's Day 1808 Jug

Mark discusses a remarkable example of early American stoneware, probably made in Manhattan, bearing an elaborate incised bird and dated March 17, 1808 (St. Patrick's Day). One of the most important pieces of New York City stoneware to surface in recent years, it will be offered as part of our November 3, 2012 stoneware auction.

Earliest Dated Example of Kentucky Stoneware, 1833

Luke discusses a recently-discovered, very important example of Kentucky stoneware, made by Evan G. Ricketts in Maysville, dated July 3, 1833. This pitcher will be sold as part of our Fall 2012 antique American stoneware and redware auction, to be held November 3, 2012.

Anna Pottery Aquarium Castle (Kirkpatrick Bros., Anna, Illinois)

Mark talks about an extremely rare and fine, large-sized aquarium castle made by Anna Pottery in Anna, Illinois, circa 1875. A coveted form in American stoneware, this is one of the finest known, and will be sold as part of our November 3, 2012 stoneware auction.

Early Baltimore Stoneware Birds Crock

Luke discusses a remarkable Baltimore stoneware discovery: a circa late 1810's stoneware jar bearing the cobalt design of five birds in a vine. Clearly influenced by the work of fellow Baltimore potter Henry Remmey, it was probably made by Elisha Parr. This exceptionally decorated example will be sold as part of our November 3, 2012 stoneware and redware auction.

Alexandria, Virginia, Antique Stoneware Primer

Mark discusses the progression of Alexandria stoneware from around 1820 until the middle of the century--using four Alexandria examples (John Swann, Hugh Smith, Hugh Charles Smith, B.C. Milburn) and one Washington jar (John Walker) to do so. In particular, Mark describes what has become known as the typical Alexandria design, and its use over the decades. Three of these pieces will be sold as part of our November 3, 2012 stoneware auction.

Anna Pottery Snake Temperance Jug, circa 1875

Mark talks about one of the finest examples of Anna Pottery--made by the Kirkpatrick Brothers (Wallace & Cornwall K.) in Anna, Illinois--we have ever handled. This "temperance jug"--meant to play off the concept of the evils of alcohol--is one of a group of rare, elaborate jugs featuring people being tormented by frightening creatures, particularly snakes. It will be sold as part of our July 21, 2012 stoneware & redware pottery auction.

Antique Huntingdon County, Pennsylvania, Stoneware Pottery: Henry Glazier and His Peers

Brandt talks about the stoneware potters of Huntingdon County, PA--between Harrisburg and Altoona. With a distinct style of their own, chief amongst these potters was Henry Glazier--an extraordinary example of whose work we will be selling in our July 21, 2012 American Stoneware & Redware Auction.

Thomas Commeraw Early COERLEARS HOOK (NYC) 18th Century Stoneware Jar

Brandt discusses one of the finest examples of African-American New York City potter Thomas Commeraw's work to have surfaced in recent years: a circa late 1790's stoneware pottery jar bearing his early maker's mark, and decorated with a bright blue, incised freehand design. Brandt's book on Commeraw will be completed soon. This particular example will be selling as part of our exciting Summer 2012 Stoneware & Redware Auction, to be held July 21.

Antique Southwestern Pennsylvania Stoneware Bank

Banks are amongst the rarest of all American stoneware forms, and southwestern Pennsylvania was no exception. Mark discusses a profusely-decorated example we will be selling on July 21, 2012, as part of our Summer 2012 Antique Stoneware & Redware Pottery auction.

Chester County, Pennsylvania Stoneware Jar Marked R.J. GRIER (Extremely Rare)

Brandt talks about Ralph J. Grier; his family's pottery in East Nottingham (near Oxford), Pennsylvania; and the signed Grier jar we will be selling on July 21, 2012, as part of our Summer 2012 Antique Stoneware & Redware Pottery auction. Though a very prolific potter whose attributable work shows up with regularity in Pennsylvania, Maryland, and Delaware, Grier's maker's mark is extremely rare.

Anthony Baecher Redware Pottery Sugar Bowl (Shenandoah Valley of VA)

Anthony W. Bacher / Baecher was one of the most talented and intricate of all of the Shenandoah Valley potters, producing pottery most notably in Winchester, Virginia. Mark discusses what is perhaps the finest sugar bowl of his in existence. It will be sold as part of our July 2012 stoneware & redware auction.

Antique Alexandria, Virginia, Stoneware Pottery

Brandt discusses Alexandria stoneware in general, and in particular James Shinnick--a basically unknown potter who apprenticed in Baltimore before working in Alexandria and other Virginia locales. A pitcher made at merchant Hugh C. Smith's pottery on Wilkes Street is featured in this video; it was probably made by Shinnick, and will be sold as part of our March 3, 2012 auction.

Early Antique American New York City / New Jersey Stoneware Jar, circa 1750

Brandt discusses what is one of the more important early American stoneware discoveries of the last few decades: one of the earliest and most heavily-decorated intact pieces of American stoneware. Very possibly the earliest example of New York City stoneware known, it was made in Manhattan by the Crolius and Remmey potters, or by one of their associates in New Jersey. This jar will be sold on March 3, 2012 as part of our Landmark March 2012 Stoneware & Redware Auction.

Cowden & Wilcox (Harrisburg, Pennsylvania) Stoneware

Mark discusses antique stoneware pottery made by John Cowden & Isaac Wilcox in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, circa 1860's and beyond. These three examples will be sold as part of our March 3, 2012 stoneware auction.

Antique Presentation Stoneware of Eastern and Western Pennsylvania

Brandt talks about two examples of stoneware coincidentally both made for women or girls named Hannah, and uses it as an opportunity to discuss both presentation stoneware, as well as the fundamental difference between stoneware made in the eastern and western parts of the state of Pennsylvania. These two pieces will be sold on March 3, 2012.

Early Manhattan "Demon Rum" Jug

Brandt talks about an early New York stoneware jug bearing a double devil and goat design, and discusses the often playful take on temperance employed by American stoneware potters. Featured in the landmark book (and accompanying exhibit) "American Fancy" by Sumpter Priddy, this jug will be sold as part of our March 3, 2012 auction.

Remmey Family Stoneware Pottery of Philadelphia, NYC, and Baltimore

Luke uses two examples of antique stoneware made by Henry H. Remmey in Philadelphia, PA to discuss the Remmey family of potters as a whole. Two very high quality pieces that illustrate what the Remmeys were capable of, these particular examples are being sold as part of our March 3, 2012 auction.

Exceptional Antique Stoneware Horse Crock

Mark discusses a Fort Edward, New York, stoneware crock with one of the more elaborate figural designs you will see on American stoneware. To be sold March 3, 2012.

Antique Stoneware Heart-Shaped Inkstand

Mark displays and discusses what is by far one of the most beloved--and rarest--forms in all of American stoneware: the heart-shaped inkstand. This example--one of the finest examples of stoneware to surface in years--will be sold on March 3, 2012.

Shenandoah Valley of Virginia Stoneware Face Pitcher (Samuel Bell)

Mark talks about the only known Shenandoah Valley example of this rare, beloved American stoneware form: the face vessel. Definitely made in Winchester or Strasburg, Virginia, this example is attributed to Samuel Bell based on the distinct decoration found on signed S. Bell examples. It will be sold as part of our March 3, 2012 stoneware and redware auction.

New York Stoneware Presentation Flower Pot / Urn

Mark talks about an elaborately-decorated, large-sized flower pot made by William E. Warner in West Troy (now Watervliet), New York. This outstanding example of antique New York stoneware will be sold in our March 3, 2012 auction.

Antique New York Stoneware Four-Handled Jug

Mark discusses the diminutive, four-handled stoneware jug we will be selling as part of our March 3, 2012 auction. A profusely-decorated rare form in a desirable size, it was made in New York State.

Antique Stoneware People Crocks of West Virginia and Southwestern PA

Mark talks about the famous "People Crocks" in general, but specifically the two examples (one Morgantown, WV, one Uniontown, PA) we will be selling on March 3, 2012.

Philadelphia Stoneware Liberty Bell Mug, circa 1876

Brandt talks about the original research he's done on Aaron Radley (an Albany, NY-born stoneware potter who moved to Philadelphia and competed against the Remmeys) and the mug Radley made--the only known example of his work, an elaborate stoneware Liberty Bell mug made for a local tavern keeper (to be sold March 3, 2012).

David Parr Pottery (Baltimore, MD Stoneware Potter, circa 1812-32)

Luke talks about David Parr, one of the most influential American stoneware potters, and one most collectors have probably never heard of.

Remmey (Philadelphia, PA) Stoneware Bird Bank

Luke discusses the significant incised stoneware bank we will be selling as part of our March 3, 2012 auction. Made by the Remmey family in Philadelphia and dated 1874, it was probably made by the very prolific Henry Harrison Remmey.

Thomas Commeraw Pottery and Other Manhattan Stoneware

Brandt talks about several pieces of Manhattan stoneware to be sold in our October 29, 2011 auction: two exceptional examples of Thomas Commeraw stoneware, two pieces of Crolius family pottery, and a signed John Remmey III pitcher.

Midwestern Stoneware Log Cabin Group (probably Anna Pottery)

Mark discusses lot 23 in our October 29, 2011 auction--an incredible stoneware log cabin group apparently Midwestern and recently discovered in Illinois.